Bookmarks for 28 ago 2014 from 12:10 to 13:11

These are my links for 28 ago 2014 from 12:10 to 13:11:

  • CloudInit – Community Help Wiki – cloud-init is the Ubuntu package that handles early initialization of a cloud instance. It is installed in the Ubuntu Cloud Images and also in the official Ubuntu images available on EC2. Some of the things it configures are: setting a default locale setting hostname generate ssh private keys adding ssh keys to user's .ssh/authorized_keys so they can log in setting up ephemeral mount points cloud-init's behavior can be configured via user-data. User-data can be given by the user at instance launch time. This is done via the –user-data or –user-data-file argument to ec2-run-instances
  • Tsunami UDP Protocol – Tsunami UDP Protocol: A fast user-space file transfer protocol that uses TCP control and UDP data for transfer over very high speed long distance networks (≥ 1 Gbps and even 10 GE), designed to provide more throughput than possible with TCP over the same networks. The project is based on original Indiana University 2002 Tsunami source code, but has been significantly improved and extended. As such, large portions of the program today are courtesy by Aalto University Metsähovi Radio Observatory. Includes FTP-like client and server command line applications for normal file transfers. It has additionally been extended for high rate real-time data streaming in eVLBI radio astronomy and geodesy (VSIB, PCEVN DAQ). Licensed under the original IU open source license.
  • Obama for America on AWS – Infrastructure Architecture – Obama for America on AWS – Infrastructure Architecture
  • holman/spark – sparklines for your shell

Bookmarks for 28 ago 2014 from 09:32 to 11:55

These are my links for 28 ago 2014 from 09:32 to 11:55:

  • Keepalived for Linux – Keepalived is a routing software written in C. The main goal of this project is to provide simple and robust facilities for loadbalancing and high-availability to Linux system and Linux based infrastructures. Loadbalancing framework relies on well-known and widely used Linux Virtual Server (IPVS) kernel module providing Layer4 loadbalancing. Keepalived implements a set of checkers to dynamically and adaptively maintain and manage loadbalanced server pool according their health. On the other hand high-availability is achieved by VRRP protocol. VRRP is a fundamental brick for router failover. In addition, Keepalived implements a set of hooks to the VRRP finite state machine providing low-level and high-speed protocol interactions. Keepalived frameworks can be used independently or all together to provide resilient infrastructures.
  • The BIRD Internet Routing Daemon Project – BIRD is an Internet Routing Daemon designed to avoid all of these shortcomings, to support all the routing technology used in the today's Internet or planned to be used in near future and to have a clean extensible architecture allowing new routing protocols to be incorporated easily. Among other features, BIRD supports: * both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols * multiple routing tables * the Border Gateway Protocol (BGPv4) * the Routing Information Protocol (RIPv2) * the Open Shortest Path First protocol (OSPFv2, OSPFv3) * the Router Advertisements for IPv6 hosts a virtual protocol for exchange of routes between different routing tables on a single host a command-line interface allowing on-line control and inspection of status of the daemon soft reconfiguration[...]
  • How to make MaxScale High Available with Corosync/Pacemaker | MariaDB – MaxScale, an open-source database-centric router for MySQL and MariaDB makes High Availability possible by hiding the complexity of backends and masking failures. MaxScale itself however is a single application running in a Linux box between the client application and the databases – so how do we make MaxScale High Available? This blog post shows how to quickly setup a Pacemaker/Corosync environment and configure MaxScale as a managed cluster resource.

Bookmarks for 27 ago 2014 from 11:57 to 17:02

These are my links for 27 ago 2014 from 11:57 to 17:02:

  • monitoringsucks/tool-repos – Tracking various tools that fit in the monitoring and metrics space
  • OpenELEC Mediacenter – Home – Open Embedded Linux Entertainment Center (OpenELEC) is a small Linux distribution built from scratch as a platform to turn your computer into an XBMC media center. OpenELEC is designed to make your system boot fast, and the install is so easy that anyone can turn a blank PC into a media machine in less than 15 minutes.
  • Raspbmc – Raspbmc is a minimal Linux distribution based on Debian that brings XBMC to your Raspberry Pi.

Bookmarks for 26 ago 2014 through 27 ago 2014

These are my links for 26 ago 2014 through 27 ago 2014:

  • Regular Expressions – Regular expressions ("regexes") are supercharged Find/Replace string operations. Regular expressions are used when editing text in a text editor, to: check whether the text contains a certain pattern find those pattern matches, if there are any pull information (i.e. substrings) out of the text make modifications to the text. As well as text editors, almost every high-level programming language includes support for regular expressions. In this context "the text" is just a string variable, but the operations available are the same. Some programming languages (Perl, JavaScript) even provide dedicated syntax for regular expression operations.
  • MySQL active-passive cluster | Your IT goes Linux – We will use the iSCSI Lun defined in our iSCSI cluster as a shared storage and we will run MySQL in active-passive (fail-over) mode using Pacemaker and Corosync cluster engine. The cluster will have to connect to the iSCSI target, mount the iSCSI partition on one node and start a MySQL service which has all its data on this partition.
  • Perl – [...] Perl has horrors, but it also has some great redeeming features. In this respect it is like every other programming language ever created. This document is intended to be informative, not evangelical. It is aimed at people who, like me: dislike the official Perl documentation at http://perl.org/ for being intensely technical and giving far too much space to very unusual edge cases learn new programming languages most quickly by "axiom and example" wish Larry Wall would get to the point already know how to program in general terms don't care about Perl beyond what's necessary to get the job done. This document is intended to be as short as possible, but no shorter[...]
  • Linux Performance – This page links to various Linux performance material I've created, including the tools maps on the right, which show: Linux observability tools, Linux benchmarking tools, Linux tuning tools, and Linux observability sar. For more diagrams, see my slide decks below.
  • AIXchange: Useful Storage Links – Here's an assortment of really good storage-related articles — the majority of which are found on IBM developerWorks — that are worth your time. While some of them are a few years old, they still provide relevant information.