Bookmarks for 1 apr 2014 from 13:31 to 14:21

These are my links for 1 apr 2014 from 13:31 to 14:21:

Bookmarks for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014

These are my links for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014:

  • LDAP org chart | bitcube.co.uk – For centralised authentication and authorisation, LDAP is the de-facto standard. Whether in its pure form on Unix or in Active Directory guise on Windows, everyone uses it. What many people don't realise is that you can store all sorts of useful (and not so useful) information in LDAP. One field which can be useful is the "manager" attribute. One of our customers use that and so we've written a small script to graph it using the excellent Graphviz tool. It will probably need customising for specific cases, however we hope that people find it useful nonetheless. If you want to alter the output, do have a look at the record format documentation.
  • Puppet errors explained | bitcube.co.uk – Puppet is a wonderful system automation tool, however the learning curve can be a little steep. We've collected some of the errors messages and "strange" behaviour you may come across together with explanations to help overcome these hurdles and boost adoption of this fabulous tool. If you have any useful errors and explanations, please do send them in and we'll update this article.
  • SCAP: Guide To The Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 – This guide has been created to assist IT professionals, in effectively securing systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
  • DNS Load Balancing and Using Multiple Load Balancers in the Cloud – [...] Load balancing in general is a complicated process, but there's some secret sauce in managing DNS along with multiple load balancers in the cloud. It requires that you draw from a few different sets of networking and “cloudy” concepts. In this second article in my best practices series (my first post covered how to use credentials within RightScale for storing sensitive or frequently used values), I'll explain how to set up load balancers to build a fault-tolerant, highly available web application in the cloud. Here's what you’ll need: Multiple A records for a host name in the DNS service of your choice Multiple load balancers to protect against failure [...]
  • gdnsd – gdnsd is an Authoritative-only DNS server which does geographic (or other sorts of) balancing, redirection, weighting, and service-state-conscious failover at the DNS layer. gdnsd is written in C using libev and pthreads with a focus on high performance, low latency service. It does not offer any form of caching or recursive service, and notably does not support DNSSEC. There's a strong focus on making the code efficient, lean, and resilient. The code has a decent regression testsuite with full branch coverage on the core packet parsing and generation code, and some scripted QA tools for e.g. valgrind validation, clang-analyzer, etc. The geographically-aware features also support the emerging EDNS Client Subnet draft for receiving more-precise network location information from intermediate shared caches.

Bookmarks for 25 mar 2014 through 28 mar 2014

These are my links for 25 mar 2014 through 28 mar 2014:

  • blblack/gdnsd – gdnsd is an Authoritative-only DNS server. The initial g stands for Geographic, as gdnsd offers a plugin system for geographic (or other sorts of) balancing, redirection, and service-state-conscious failover. The plugin system can also do things like weighted address/cname records. If you don't care about these features you can ignore them :).
  • How to Create and Apply Patches in GIT using diff and apply Command – Creating a patch in GIT is a great way to share changes that you are not yet ready to push to a public branch of a project.
  • Your own Dynamic DNS in 3 steps | The Nexus – This is a "niche" post: it will really only appeal to you if you have access to your own — or a friend's — name servers and want to use your own domain to track your dynamic IP addresses, such as your home router's. You will still have to buy your own domain, cheap if you go to internet.bs or namecheap.com. I hear that the latter even provide their own dynamic DNS service although I cannot tell you anything about its quality/flexibility. So, why this post? It's for you, my friends, budding entrepreneurs who wish to bootstrap your business and know that every cent counts. Maybe you feel that you could host your product's web site on a home computer. Maybe you need more control over what happens on that server. Or maybe you want to be able to log on to your development machine from anywhere in the world. Whatever your reasons, you're still here. So let's get started.
  • Apache – Prefork or Worker | Code Bucket – Apache is the most common and famous webserver. Everyone knows about apache and most of us also have hands on experience with apache. But few of us know that apcahe2 comes with 2 multi processing modules(MPMs): 1. Prefork 2. Worker
  • Ottimizzazione di Apache, dall’analisi ai parametri – [...] I recenti sviluppi nel campo della virtualizzazione hanno accelerato la moltiplicazione di ambienti virtuali vps a basso costo, molto convenienti ma a volte carenti dal punto di vista delle risorse di sistema. Molto spesso questi ambienti vengono utilizzati a scopo di testing o come ambienti di produzione all'interno dei quali viene implementato l'utilizzo di un web server. Apache, come ben sappiamo ,e uno dei web server piu diffusi e nella maggioranza dei casi rappresenta la scelta di default su un grandissimo numero di installazioni [...]

Bookmarks for 24 mar 2014 from 13:13 to 18:33

These are my links for 24 mar 2014 from 13:13 to 18:33:

  • ZPanel | The free web hosting panel – ZPanel is an easy to use, enterprise class web hosting control panel with support for unlimited resellers. From the largest business to SOHO or development environments, ZPanel can support your needs.
  • Bucky — Performance Measurement of Your App’s Actual Users – Bucky is a client and server for sending performance data from the client into statsd+graphite, OpenTSDB, or any other stats aggregator of your choice. It can automatically measure how long your pages take to load, how long AJAX requests take and how long various functions take to run. Most importantly, it's taking the measurements on actual page loads, so the data has the potential to be much more valuable than in vitro measurements. If you already use statsd or OpenTSDB, you can get started in just a few minutes. If you're not collecting stats, you should start! What gets measured gets managed.
  • Linux on 4 KB sector disks: Practical advice – Advanced Format disks use 4,096-byte sectors rather than the more common 512-byte sectors. This change is masked by firmware that breaks the 4,096-byte physical sectors into 512-byte logical sectors for the benefit of the operating system, but the use of larger physical sectors has implications for disk layout and system performance. This article examines these implications, including benchmark tests illustrating the likely real-world effects on some common Linux file systems. As Advanced Format disks have become the norm, understanding how to cope with these disks is a vital skill for anyone who wants to avoid serious performance penalties associated with suboptimal configuration.
  • WPScan by the WPScan Team – WPScan is a black box WordPress vulnerability scanner.
  • SiteSucker for OS X – SiteSucker is a Macintosh application that automatically downloads Web sites from the Internet. It does this by asynchronously copying the site's Web pages, images, backgrounds, movies, and other files to your local hard drive, duplicating the site's directory structure. Just enter a URL (Uniform Resource Locator), press return, and SiteSucker can download an entire Web site. [ via http://onethingwell.org/post/79174700058/sitesucker ]