Bookmarks for 26 ago 2014 from 11:20 to 11:53

These are my links for 26 ago 2014 from 11:20 to 11:53:

  • claudioc/jingo – A git based wiki engine written for node.js, with a decent design, a search capability and a good typography.
  • fastmonkeys/stellar – Stellar allows you to quickly restore database when you are e.g. writing database migrations, switching branches or messing with SQL. PostgreSQL and MySQL are supported.
  • Sandstorm Apps – This page is for people who already have a Sandstorm instance set up. Use the buttons below to install apps.
  • Sandstorm – Sandstorm's server-side sandboxing is based on the same underlying Linux kernel features as LXC and Docker. We use the system calls directly for finer-grained control.
  • apenwarr/sshuttle – Transparent proxy server that works as a poor man's VPN. Forwards over ssh. Doesn't require admin. Works with Linux and MacOS. Supports DNS tunneling.

Bookmarks for 25 ago 2014 from 15:03 to 17:25

These are my links for 25 ago 2014 from 15:03 to 17:25:

  • Passwordless – A node.js/express module for token-based logins – Token-based authentication middleware for Express & Node.js [...] Passwords are broken. Inspired by Justin Balthrop's article Passwords are Obsolete token-based one-time password (OTPW) authentication is faster to deploy, better for your users, and more secure. [...]
  • Mounty for NTFS – A tiny tool to re-mount write-protected NTFS volumes under Mac OS X Mavericks in read-write mode.
  • tinc wiki – tinc is a Virtual Private Network (VPN) daemon that uses tunnelling and encryption to create a secure private network between hosts on the Internet. tinc is Free Software and licensed under the GNU General Public License version 2 or later. Because the VPN appears to the IP level network code as a normal network device, there is no need to adapt any existing software. This allows VPN sites to share information with each other over the Internet without exposing any information to others.
  • AIXchange: More Resources for AIX Newbies – As I've noted previously, there are more newcomers to the AIX platform than you might imagine. A company may acquire an AIX system through a merger or replace an old Solaris or HP-UX box with a current IBM Power Systems model. As a result, one of their IT pros suddenly becomes the AIX guy. So, now what? How does an AIX newbie get up to speed with virtualization and AIX?

Bookmarks for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014

These are my links for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014:

  • Top 5 Atom Editor features and tweaks | Grigio.org – un blog critico su Linux Ubuntu, Tecnologia e altro
  • Hemingway – Hemingway App makes your writing bold and clear. Hemingway highlights long, complex sentences and common errors; if you see a yellow highlight, shorten the sentence or split it. If you see a red highlight, your sentence is so dense and complicated that your readers will get lost trying to follow its meandering, splitting logic — try editing this sentence to remove the red.
  • mpalmer/lvmsync – Have you ever wanted to do a partial sync on a block device, possibly over a network, but were stymied by the fact that rsync just didn't work? Well, fret no longer. As long as you use LVM for your block devices, you too can have efficient delta-transfer of changed blocks.
  • gerrit – Gerrit Code Review – Google Project Hosting – Gerrit is a web based code review system, facilitating online code reviews for projects using the Git version control system. Gerrit makes reviews easier by showing changes in a side-by-side display, and allowing inline comments to be added by any reviewer. Gerrit simplifies Git based project maintainership by permitting any authorized user to submit changes to the master Git repository, rather than requiring all approved changes to be merged in by hand by the project maintainer. This functionality enables a more centralized usage of Git
  • ranger – ranger is a file manager with VI key bindings. It provides a minimalistic and nice curses interface with a view on the directory hierarchy. The secondary task of ranger is to psychically guess which program you want to use for opening particular files.