Bookmarks for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014

These are my links for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014:

  • Top 5 Atom Editor features and tweaks | Grigio.org – un blog critico su Linux Ubuntu, Tecnologia e altro
  • Hemingway – Hemingway App makes your writing bold and clear. Hemingway highlights long, complex sentences and common errors; if you see a yellow highlight, shorten the sentence or split it. If you see a red highlight, your sentence is so dense and complicated that your readers will get lost trying to follow its meandering, splitting logic — try editing this sentence to remove the red.
  • mpalmer/lvmsync – Have you ever wanted to do a partial sync on a block device, possibly over a network, but were stymied by the fact that rsync just didn't work? Well, fret no longer. As long as you use LVM for your block devices, you too can have efficient delta-transfer of changed blocks.
  • gerrit – Gerrit Code Review – Google Project Hosting – Gerrit is a web based code review system, facilitating online code reviews for projects using the Git version control system. Gerrit makes reviews easier by showing changes in a side-by-side display, and allowing inline comments to be added by any reviewer. Gerrit simplifies Git based project maintainership by permitting any authorized user to submit changes to the master Git repository, rather than requiring all approved changes to be merged in by hand by the project maintainer. This functionality enables a more centralized usage of Git
  • ranger – ranger is a file manager with VI key bindings. It provides a minimalistic and nice curses interface with a view on the directory hierarchy. The secondary task of ranger is to psychically guess which program you want to use for opening particular files.

Bookmarks for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014

These are my links for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014:

  • Ralentir le débit de postfix pour wanadoo/orange – Le blog de Michauko – Si vous avez un serveur d’envoi de mails (je ne parle pas d’être un spammeur) et beaucoup d’abonnés chez Wanadoo et Orange, vous risquez fort le rejet temporaire de votre serveur si le débit d’envoi est trop fort. C’est ce qui m’est arrivé et hop, 5000 mails entassés dans la file de postfix.
  • smtp-in.orange.fr refused to talk to me: postfix solution | floriancrouzat.net – Orange sadly limits inbound connexion to it’s MX to 1 connexion per IP, which is a total pain in the ass when you try to deliver newsletter, or manage a MTA. Here is a sample log from their MX: Jul 4 10:42:42 smtp.example.com postfix/smtp[32347]: 0123456789: host smtp-in.orange.fr[193.252.22.65] refused to talk to me: 421 mwinf5c34 ME Trop de connexions, veuillez verifier votre configuration. Too many connections, slow down. OFR004_104 [104] However, since they won’t change anything, we have to take mesures, here’s what you can do if you run postfix: you have to set a per-destination concurrency limit.
  • Aral Balkan: Historical Archive — How to revert (roll back) to a previous revision with Subversion – Here, then, is a very simple, plain English explanation of how to revert to a previous version of your application in Subversion, to help anyone who may be starting out with it and is lost.
  • Tmux: A Simple Start – In all likelihood, you’ve probably already heard of tmux. However, you may not be using it everyday. If tmux is on your “Someday” list because you think it is too complicated (I mean, c’mon, the word “multiplexer” is just plain scary), then I am here to show you just how easy it is to put tmux into your workflow.
  • Tyblog | Yet Another Vim Setup – Vim is an excellent text editor. I’ve used it for many years and like most vim users, have collected a fairly large collection of settings in my .vimrc and learned how to grok my vim usage effectively through a lot of trial and error. To that end, I’ve tried to assemble a useful overview of my experience with vim.

Bookmarks for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014

These are my links for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014:

  • LDAP org chart | bitcube.co.uk – For centralised authentication and authorisation, LDAP is the de-facto standard. Whether in its pure form on Unix or in Active Directory guise on Windows, everyone uses it. What many people don't realise is that you can store all sorts of useful (and not so useful) information in LDAP. One field which can be useful is the "manager" attribute. One of our customers use that and so we've written a small script to graph it using the excellent Graphviz tool. It will probably need customising for specific cases, however we hope that people find it useful nonetheless. If you want to alter the output, do have a look at the record format documentation.
  • Puppet errors explained | bitcube.co.uk – Puppet is a wonderful system automation tool, however the learning curve can be a little steep. We've collected some of the errors messages and "strange" behaviour you may come across together with explanations to help overcome these hurdles and boost adoption of this fabulous tool. If you have any useful errors and explanations, please do send them in and we'll update this article.
  • SCAP: Guide To The Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 – This guide has been created to assist IT professionals, in effectively securing systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
  • DNS Load Balancing and Using Multiple Load Balancers in the Cloud – [...] Load balancing in general is a complicated process, but there's some secret sauce in managing DNS along with multiple load balancers in the cloud. It requires that you draw from a few different sets of networking and “cloudy” concepts. In this second article in my best practices series (my first post covered how to use credentials within RightScale for storing sensitive or frequently used values), I'll explain how to set up load balancers to build a fault-tolerant, highly available web application in the cloud. Here's what you’ll need: Multiple A records for a host name in the DNS service of your choice Multiple load balancers to protect against failure [...]
  • gdnsd – gdnsd is an Authoritative-only DNS server which does geographic (or other sorts of) balancing, redirection, weighting, and service-state-conscious failover at the DNS layer. gdnsd is written in C using libev and pthreads with a focus on high performance, low latency service. It does not offer any form of caching or recursive service, and notably does not support DNSSEC. There's a strong focus on making the code efficient, lean, and resilient. The code has a decent regression testsuite with full branch coverage on the core packet parsing and generation code, and some scripted QA tools for e.g. valgrind validation, clang-analyzer, etc. The geographically-aware features also support the emerging EDNS Client Subnet draft for receiving more-precise network location information from intermediate shared caches.