Bookmarks for 9 Dic 2015 through 10 Dic 2015

These are my links for 9 Dic 2015 through 10 Dic 2015:

  • JavaScript: The World’s Most Misunderstood Programming Language – JavaScript, aka Mocha, aka LiveScript, aka JScript, aka ECMAScript, is one of the world's most popular programming languages. Virtually every personal computer in the world has at least one JavaScript interpreter installed on it and in active use. JavaScript's popularity is due entirely to its role as the scripting language of the WWW. Despite its popularity, few know that JavaScript is a very nice dynamic object-oriented general-purpose programming language. How can this be a secret? Why is this language so misunderstood?
  • Dynamic multi-point VPN with OpenNHRP powered linux hub – This post aims to explain how to configure a dynamic multi-point site-to-site VPN over IPSEC between CISCO routers and a Linux machine using the NHRP protocol. […] To support the NHRP protocol I used OpenNHRP, an open-source implementation of the NHRP protocol. To bring up the IPSec tunnels, I used racoon with pre-shared key based authentication.
  • portableR – portableR is a version of R statistics that have all their static libraries within the same folder, this lets run in x86_64 VMs. This project is aimed to run in web servers to build microservices (AWS Lambda) that require R to process data, png chart generation, etc.

Bookmarks for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015

These are my links for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015:

  • My Blog: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: Basic Configuration – Our goal: Create an Auto Scaling EC2 Group in a single Availability Zone and use a HTTP status page as a Health Monitor for our Load Balancer and the Auto Scaling group instances. This exercise will show us some Auto Scaling basics and will be useful to understand the concepts beneath but the Auto Scaling Group will not automatically "scale" responding to external influence like Average CPU Usage or Total Apache Connections (This aspect is covered in this post: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: External CloudWatch Metric). With the Auto Scaling configuration described here, we will obtain a web server cluster that can be increased and decreased in members with a simple Auto Scaling API call and we will transfer the monitoring role to the ELB to automatically replace failed EC2 instances or web servers.
  • Autoscaling with custom metrics « That’s Geeky – One of the appeals of cloud computing is the idea of using what you need when you need. One of the ways that Amazon provides for this is through autoscaling. In essence, this allows you to vary the number of (related) running instances according to some metric that is being tracked. In this article, we look at how you can trigger a change in the number of running instances using a custom Cloudwatch metric – including the setup of said metric, and a brief look at the interactions between the various autoscaling commands used.
  • Painless AWS Auto Scaling With EBS Snapshots And Capistrano – Boom – AWS (Amazon Web Services) auto scaling is a simple concept on the surface: You get an AMI, set up rules, and the load balancer takes care of the rest. However, actually getting it done is more complicated. Some choices are worse than others: you could bake an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) before you deploy, but that could add 10 minutes or more to each deployment. Some are dangerous: you could create an AMI after each deploy, but you run the risk that an auto scale even happens before your AMIs are done. Plus, you have a whole variety of AMIs deployed in at any given time. Some are similar to what we propose in this tutorial: you could push your code to S3 on each deploy and have user-data scripts that pull it down on each auto scaling event. However you slice it, to get auto scaling to fit into your development work flow in a transparent way takes careful thought and planning. We recently rolled out the following solution at CodePen. It keeps our AMIs static and our application ready for scaling on EBS (Elastic Block Store) snapshots. We can push code using Capistrano and let a few scripts distribute the ever-changing code base to our fleet of servers. I’d like to share the steps required to make it work. This series of posts will walk you through the steps required to build an auto-scaling infrastructure that stays out of your way.
  • coderwall.com : establishing geek cred since 1305712800 – Did you accidentally set node.normal[:foo][:bar] = 'something bad' in your chef recipe? Then you found that the node's normal attributes persisted between chef runs, and you really wanted to use the default attribute precedence level in your cookbook's attributes/default.rb file?

Bookmarks for 12 mag 2015 through 15 mag 2015

These are my links for 12 mag 2015 through 15 mag 2015:

  • slack for ubuntu – ScudCloud is a non official open-source Linux (Debian, Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Mint, Arch) desktop client for Slack©. Slack© is a platform for team communication. ScudCloud uses the QT library + Webkit to render the web version of Slack, but using the QWebkit-Native bridge to improve desktop integration with: multiple teams support, native system notifications, count of unread direct mentions at launcher/sytray icon, alert/wobbling on new messages, channels quicklist (Unity only), optional "Close to Tray".
  • How to create an RPM package – FedoraProject – This page describes in detail how to create an RPM package, and in particular, how to create a SPEC file. Unlike other RPM guides, this page explains the specifics for Fedora with links to Fedora-specific guidelines. Since it is maintained through the Fedora Wiki, it is likely to be more up-to-date than other guides. Despite the focus on Fedora, most of this document does apply to other RPM-based distributions.
  • How To Install Elasticsearch, Logstash, and Kibana 4 on CentOS 7 | DigitalOcean – In this tutorial, we will go over the installation of the Elasticsearch ELK Stack on CentOS 7—that is, Elasticsearch 1.4.4, Logstash 1.5.0, and Kibana 4. We will also show you how to configure it to gather and visualize the syslogs of your systems in a centralized location. Logstash is an open source tool for collecting, parsing, and storing logs for future use. Kibana 4 is a web interface that can be used to search and view the logs that Logstash has indexed. Both of these tools are based on Elasticsearch.

Bookmarks for 1 mag 2015 through 12 mag 2015

These are my links for 1 mag 2015 through 12 mag 2015: