Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – cfenollosa.com/misc/tricks.txt – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – MNX.io – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.
  • Vim Awesome – AWESOME VIM PLUGINS from ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Bookmarks for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014

These are my links for 3 lug 2014 through 8 lug 2014:

  • Top 5 Atom Editor features and tweaks | Grigio.org – un blog critico su Linux Ubuntu, Tecnologia e altro
  • Hemingway – Hemingway App makes your writing bold and clear. Hemingway highlights long, complex sentences and common errors; if you see a yellow highlight, shorten the sentence or split it. If you see a red highlight, your sentence is so dense and complicated that your readers will get lost trying to follow its meandering, splitting logic — try editing this sentence to remove the red.
  • mpalmer/lvmsync – Have you ever wanted to do a partial sync on a block device, possibly over a network, but were stymied by the fact that rsync just didn't work? Well, fret no longer. As long as you use LVM for your block devices, you too can have efficient delta-transfer of changed blocks.
  • gerrit – Gerrit Code Review – Google Project Hosting – Gerrit is a web based code review system, facilitating online code reviews for projects using the Git version control system. Gerrit makes reviews easier by showing changes in a side-by-side display, and allowing inline comments to be added by any reviewer. Gerrit simplifies Git based project maintainership by permitting any authorized user to submit changes to the master Git repository, rather than requiring all approved changes to be merged in by hand by the project maintainer. This functionality enables a more centralized usage of Git
  • ranger – ranger is a file manager with VI key bindings. It provides a minimalistic and nice curses interface with a view on the directory hierarchy. The secondary task of ranger is to psychically guess which program you want to use for opening particular files.

Bookmarks for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014

These are my links for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014:

  • Babun | A windows shell you will love! – Would you like to use a linux-like console on a Windows host without a lot of fuzz? Try out babun!
  • OpenSSH – Wikibooks, open books for an open world – The OpenSSH suite provides secure remote access and file transfer. Since its initial release, it has grown to become the most widely used implementation of the SSH protocol. During the first ten years of its existence, ssh has largely replaced older corresponding unencrypted tools and protocols. The OpenSSH client is included by default in most operating system distributions, including OS X, Linux, BSD and Solaris. Any day you use the Internet, you are using and relying on dozens if not hundreds of machines operated and maintained using OpenSSH. A survey in 2008 showed that of the SSH servers found running, just over 80% were OpenSSH. [1] OpenSSH was first released towards the end of 1999. It is the latest step in a very long and useful history of networked computing, remote access and telecommuting. This book is for fellow users of OpenSSH to help them save effort and time through using OpenSSH, and especially SFTP, where it makes sense to use it.
  • ssl-cert-check » Linux Shtuff – [...] Digital certificates have become an essential part of Internet commerce, and are widely used to verify the identity of clients and servers. All digital certificates contain an expiration date which most client and server applications will check before using the certificates contents. If a client or server application detects that a certificate has expired, one or more implementation specific actions (e.g., abort connection, check or update a revocation list, alert user, etc.) are typically performed.[...]