Bookmarks for 5 lug 2012 through 6 lug 2012

These are my links for 5 lug 2012 through 6 lug 2012:

  • NetHogs: What program is using that bandwidth? – NetHogs is a small 'net top' tool. Instead of breaking the traffic down per protocol or per subnet, like most tools do, it groups bandwidth by process. NetHogs does not rely on a special kernel module to be loaded. If there's suddenly a lot of network traffic, you can fire up NetHogs and immediately see which PID is causing this. This makes it easy to indentify programs that have gone wild and are suddenly taking up your bandwidth.

    [ via http://www.zarrelli.org/ ]

  • LiveUSB image with OpenBSD – carry your OS on a memory stick – It is trivial to a create a bootable USB stick with OpenBSD. I wanted to create one and realized that this will be of general use for anyone who likes a UNIX USB memory stick that they can carry with them on a keychain.

    If you wish to have LiveCD/LiveDVD instead, please refer to our other LiveCD-OpenBSD project on sourceforge!

    This USB image shall not touch your hard disk in any way. All the operations are done in the USB stick and main memory. Nothing will be written to your MBR or boot loaders!

  • Jon Hart’s Blog: OpenBSD on Soekris — A Cheater’s Guide – Below are the steps I recently used to get my NET4801 running OpenBSD 4.2 -current. The difference here is that I use qemu to make use of the considerably faster CPU on my desktop to breeze through the install and initial configuration.

Bookmarks for 7 mag 2010 through 12 mag 2010

These are my links for 7 mag 2010 through 12 mag 2010:

  • AIX « I am vistababa!
  • How to get unrestricted root access to HMC? « I am vistababa! – Using GUI interface of HMC, you can’t do everything you like! You just can use predefined features of GUI. For example, you can’t schedule every commands you want, or you can’t run a command remotely on clients from HMC, and so on.
  • Get your Dell Service Tag number via the Linux (or Windows) command-line – Brandon Checketts – When your server is located in a data center far away, it makes it difficult to walk over to the box and read the service tag off of it. Fortunately, the Service Tag is stored somewhere in the system BIOS, and is accessible with the ‘dmidecode’ utility.
  • TCP Traffic Analyzer (Yahoo! Developer Network Blog) – You probably have questions like these about traffic on a TCP (Transmission Control Protocol) server (or client):<br />
    <br />
    * How many connections lasted more (or less) than X milliseconds?<br />
    * How many connections needed more than N attempts to succeed?<br />
    * What is the distribution of connection duration or connection throughput?<br />
    * What is the distribution of connection duration or throughput for connections in which the server or client sent more than N bytes?<br />
    * What specific IP addresses and ports had connections that lasted between 50 and 100 milliseconds long?<br />
    <br />
    You can get answers to these questions (and more) using Yahoo!'s TCP Traffic Analyzer (yconalyzer), available as an open-source project via free download.