Bookmarks for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014

These are my links for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014:

  • Inbox – The next-generation email platform – Inbox uses standard interfaces that you've come to expect from modern APIs. We've taken care of the bugs and edge-cases with character encodings, MIME structures, misformatted socket protocols, and more. Plus, your app will continue to "just work" over the same API as more providers are added.
  • RainLoop Webmail – Modest system requirements, decent performance, simple installation and upgrade, no database required – all these make RainLoop Webmail a perfect choice for your email solution. You are free to use RainLoop Webmail for your personal or non-profit projects.
  • LCMC – The LCMC is a GUI application that configures, manages and visualizes high-availability clusters. Specifically it manages clusters that use one or more of these components: Pacemaker, Corosync, Heartbeat, DRBD, KVM, XEN and LVM.
  • Index of /tig – Tig is an ncurses-based text-mode interface for git. It functions mainly as a Git repository browser, but can also assist in staging changes for commit at chunk level and act as a pager for output from various Git commands.
  • The World’s Most Powerful Browser-Based IDE – Codio – Codio is a powerful cloud and browser based IDE that covers the complete web development cycle; from prototype to deployment

Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – cfenollosa.com/misc/tricks.txt – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – MNX.io – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.
  • Vim Awesome – AWESOME VIM PLUGINS from ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Bookmarks for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014

These are my links for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014:

  • Babun | A windows shell you will love! – Would you like to use a linux-like console on a Windows host without a lot of fuzz? Try out babun!
  • OpenSSH – Wikibooks, open books for an open world – The OpenSSH suite provides secure remote access and file transfer. Since its initial release, it has grown to become the most widely used implementation of the SSH protocol. During the first ten years of its existence, ssh has largely replaced older corresponding unencrypted tools and protocols. The OpenSSH client is included by default in most operating system distributions, including OS X, Linux, BSD and Solaris. Any day you use the Internet, you are using and relying on dozens if not hundreds of machines operated and maintained using OpenSSH. A survey in 2008 showed that of the SSH servers found running, just over 80% were OpenSSH. [1] OpenSSH was first released towards the end of 1999. It is the latest step in a very long and useful history of networked computing, remote access and telecommuting. This book is for fellow users of OpenSSH to help them save effort and time through using OpenSSH, and especially SFTP, where it makes sense to use it.
  • ssl-cert-check » Linux Shtuff – [...] Digital certificates have become an essential part of Internet commerce, and are widely used to verify the identity of clients and servers. All digital certificates contain an expiration date which most client and server applications will check before using the certificates contents. If a client or server application detects that a certificate has expired, one or more implementation specific actions (e.g., abort connection, check or update a revocation list, alert user, etc.) are typically performed.[...]

Bookmarks for 18 apr 2014 through 30 apr 2014

These are my links for 18 apr 2014 through 30 apr 2014:

  • JoshData/mailinabox · GitHub – Mail-in-a-Box helps individuals take back control of their email by defining a one-click, easy-to-deploy SMTP+everything else server: a mail server in a box.
  • SSH Multi-hop Connections With Netcat Mode Proxy | Click & Find Answer ! – Since OpenSSH 5.4 there is a new feature called natcat mode, which allows you to bind STDIN and STDOUT of local SSH client to a TCP port accessible through the remote SSH server. This mode is enabled by simply calling ssh -W [HOST]:[PORT] Theoretically this should be ideal for use in the ProxyCommand setting in per-host SSH configurations, which was previously often used with the nc (netcat) command. ProxyCommand allows you to configure a machine as proxy between you local machine and the target SSH server, for example if the target SSH server is hidden behind a firewall. The problem now is, that instead of working, it throws a cryptic error message in my face: Bad packet length 1397966893.Disconnecting: Packet corrupt
  • Tyblog | SSH Kung Fu – OpenSSH is an incredible tool. Though primarily relied upon as a secure alternative to plaintext remote tools like telnet or rsh, OpenSSH (hereafter referred to as plain old ssh) has become a swiss army knife of functionality for far more than just remote logins. I rely on ssh every day for multiple purposes and feel the need to share the love for this excellent tool. What follows is a list for some of my use cases that leverage the power of ssh.
  • Baseimage-docker: A minimal Ubuntu base image modified for Docker-friendliness – YOUR DOCKER IMAGE MIGHT BE BROKEN without you knowing it Learn the right way to build your Dockerfile.
  • NetApp – Index – The following documentation is a guide on using and configuring the NetApp servers, there is also a commandline cheat sheet. I have tried to make this section as brief as possible but still cover a broad range of information regarding the NetApp product but I point you to the Official NetApp web site which contains all the documentation you will ever need.