Bookmarks for 12 ago 2013 through 16 ago 2013

These are my links for 12 ago 2013 through 16 ago 2013:

  • Epoptes – Epoptes (Επόπτης  – a Greek word for overseer) is an open source computer lab management and monitoring tool. It allows for screen broadcasting and monitoring, remote command execution, message sending, imposing restrictions like screen locking or sound muting the clients and much more! It can be installed in Ubuntu, Debian and openSUSE based labs that may contain any combination of the following: LTSP servers, thin and fat clients, non LTSP servers, standalone workstations, NX or XDMCP clients etc. Patches for other distros are welcome.
  • bcache – Bcache is a Linux kernel block layer cache. It allows one or more fast disk drives such as flash-based solid state drives (SSDs) to act as a cache for one or more slower hard disk drives. Hard drives are cheap and big, SSDs are fast but small and expensive. Wouldn't it be nice if you could transparently get the advantages of both? With Bcache, you can have your cake and eat it too. Bcache patches for the Linux kernel allow one to use SSDs to cache other block devices. It's analogous to L2Arc for ZFS, but Bcache also does writeback caching (besides just write through caching), and it's filesystem agnostic. It's designed to be switched on with a minimum of effort, and to work well without configuration on any setup. By default it won't cache sequential IO, just the random reads and writes that SSDs excel at. It's meant to be suitable for desktops, servers, high end storage arrays, and perhaps even embedded.
  • Shuttle | A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X – A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X [ via ]

Bookmarks for 8 ago 2013 through 12 ago 2013

These are my links for 8 ago 2013 through 12 ago 2013:

  • Shuttle | A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X – A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X
  • Unix FAQ/shell Index
  • Portable Shell – Autoconf – When writing your own checks, there are some shell-script programming techniques you should avoid in order to make your code portable. The Bourne shell and upward-compatible shells like the Korn shell and Bash have evolved over the years, and many features added to the original System7 shell are now supported on all interesting porting targets.

Bookmarks for 23 dic 2011 through 28 dic 2011

These are my links for 23 dic 2011 through 28 dic 2011:

  • E-MailRelay — SMTP proxy and store-and-forward MTA – E-MailRelay is a simple SMTP proxy and store-and-forward message transfer agent (MTA). When running as a proxy all e-mail messages can be passed through a user-defined program, such as a spam filter, which can drop, re-address or edit messages as they pass through. When running as a store-and-forward MTA incoming messages are stored in a local spool directory, and then forwarded to the next SMTP server on request.

    Because of its functional simplicity E-MailRelay is easy to configure, often only requiring the address of the target SMTP server to be put on the command line.

    E-MailRelay can also run as a POP3 server. Messages received over SMTP can be automatically dropped into several independent POP3 mailboxes.

    C++ source code is available for Linux, FreeBSD, MacOS X etc, and Windows. Distribution is under the GNU General Public License V3.

  • IBM developerWorks : Training : Knowledge path : Overview – Knowledge paths are focused learning guides that bring together diverse training resources for IT professionals:
       How-to articles
       Free trial software
       Discussion forums
       Educational videos and podcasts
       Hands-on exercises
    These resources are specifically chosen by subject matter experts, and arranged in sequence to guide you from conceptual awareness to task mastery.
  • Master Sheet Learn VI – The VI editor is a screen-based editor used by many Unix users. The VI editor has powerful features to aid programmers. If you master the use of Vim text editor, it can be a very powerful tool in your hands, and allow you to do amazing text editing feats with just a few taps on your keyboard.

    Many beginning users avoid using VI because the different features overwhelm them. To overcome it and practice it more you can use VI in bash. I have also collected some of the short cut keys which will be useful for you to learn VI

  • XWiki – Open Source Wiki and Content-Oriented Application Platform (Main.WebHome) – – The XWiki project offers both a generic platform for developing collaborative applications using the wiki paradigm and products developed on top of it. All XWiki software is developed in Java and under the LGPL open source license.
    It's also a second generation wiki offering the ability to install and develop small applications inside wiki pages.
    Export wiki pages to PDF, ODT, RTF, XML or HTML. Easily turn Office documents (MS Office, Open Office, PDF, etc) into wiki pages.
    Use XWiki's RESTful and XML/RPC remote APIs to easily integrate XWiki with your application.
    Documents are stored in a relational database. Use your favorite database.
    Create applications by grouping several pages together. Import and export Applications to/from your wiki.
    various authentication mechanisms suported by XWiki (Form, Basic, LDAP, Custom, etc).
    Install/update/remove extensions in/from the wiki
    Allows creating XWiki macros through wiki pages

Bookmarks for 4 lug 2011 through 5 lug 2011

These are my links for 4 lug 2011 through 5 lug 2011:

  • Keyboard shortcuts – Keyboard shortcuts are combinations of two or more keys that, when pressed, can be used to perform a task that would typically require a mouse or other pointing device. Keyboard shortcuts can make it easier to interact with your computer, saving you time and effort as you work with Windows and other programs.
  • Google Swiffy – Swiffy converts Flash SWF files to HTML5, allowing you to reuse Flash content on devices without a Flash player (such as iPhones and iPads).<br />
    Swiffy currently supports a subset of SWF 8 and ActionScript 2.0, and the output works in all Webkit browsers such as Chrome and Mobile Safari. If possible, exporting your Flash animation as a SWF 5 file might give better results.
  • Google Web Fonts