Bookmarks for 1 nov 2014 from 22:12 to 22:21

These are my links for 1 nov 2014 from 22:12 to 22:21:

  • carlhuda’s janus at master – GitHub – This is a distribution of plug-ins and mappings for Vim, Gvim and MacVim. It is designed to provide minimal working environment using the most popular plug-ins and the most common mappings. The distribution is completely customisable using a ~/.vimrc.before and ~/.vimrc.after Vim RC files.
  • Lokaltog/powerline – Powerline is a statusline plugin for vim, and provides statuslines and prompts for several other applications, including zsh, bash, tmux, IPython, Awesome and Qtile.
  • tmuxinator/tmuxinator – Manage complex tmux sessions easily
  • creaktive/rainbarf · GitHub – CPU/RAM/battery stats chart bar for tmux (and GNU screen)

Bookmarks for 31 ott 2014 through 1 nov 2014

These are my links for 31 ott 2014 through 1 nov 2014:

  • check_jvm – Nagios Exchange – JvmInspector is standalone tool + Nagios wrapper plugin (check_jvm) that dumps various properties from locally running JVMs. This information includes: * Heap & non-heap memory * Running threads * Loaded classes * Running java version, paths & arguments * On App servers only: Container server name & total active sessions (tested & supported app servers are tomcat5+ and jboss4+) JvmInspector doesn't need local or remote JMX network socket. It directly attaches to JVM's PerfData, so it MUST be started with the same USERid as the target JVM!
  • Raspberry Pi VPN Gateway – Netflix finally arrived in Germany, but guess what? It's library is heavily limited in comparision to the US one and if you like TV series as much as I do, you don't want to wait until they eventually release it year(s) later for us german users. Maybe you've heard recently of Anonabox — a small device with two ethernet ports that you can plug in front of your router and everything behind the device is routed through Tor (side note: turned out to be a scam and got pulled from Kickstarter in the end). However, it made me come up with an idea: Instead of having a Tor-box, I want a VPN-box that is connected to my PrivateInternetAccess VPN. If I'm in need of a VPN connection I just switch the WiFi network and I'm good to go. This way I can easily watch US content from Netflix as well as unblock location restricted content like YouTube, even with my iPhone or Xbox[…]
  • My Tmux Setup on – I've been using tmux as my main terminal multiplexer for about 3 years now and have refined my configuration over time to fit my daily workflow. Which is usually a mix of writing code, chef recipes, remote login into different servers and various shell tasks. This is a flexible setup that doesn't concentrate too much on doing a specific thing or replacing an IDE inside of tmux.

Bookmarks for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014

These are my links for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014:

  • LDAP org chart | – For centralised authentication and authorisation, LDAP is the de-facto standard. Whether in its pure form on Unix or in Active Directory guise on Windows, everyone uses it. What many people don't realise is that you can store all sorts of useful (and not so useful) information in LDAP. One field which can be useful is the "manager" attribute. One of our customers use that and so we've written a small script to graph it using the excellent Graphviz tool. It will probably need customising for specific cases, however we hope that people find it useful nonetheless. If you want to alter the output, do have a look at the record format documentation.
  • Puppet errors explained | – Puppet is a wonderful system automation tool, however the learning curve can be a little steep. We've collected some of the errors messages and "strange" behaviour you may come across together with explanations to help overcome these hurdles and boost adoption of this fabulous tool. If you have any useful errors and explanations, please do send them in and we'll update this article.
  • SCAP: Guide To The Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 – This guide has been created to assist IT professionals, in effectively securing systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
  • DNS Load Balancing and Using Multiple Load Balancers in the Cloud – […] Load balancing in general is a complicated process, but there's some secret sauce in managing DNS along with multiple load balancers in the cloud. It requires that you draw from a few different sets of networking and “cloudy” concepts. In this second article in my best practices series (my first post covered how to use credentials within RightScale for storing sensitive or frequently used values), I'll explain how to set up load balancers to build a fault-tolerant, highly available web application in the cloud. Here's what you’ll need: Multiple A records for a host name in the DNS service of your choice Multiple load balancers to protect against failure […]
  • gdnsd – gdnsd is an Authoritative-only DNS server which does geographic (or other sorts of) balancing, redirection, weighting, and service-state-conscious failover at the DNS layer. gdnsd is written in C using libev and pthreads with a focus on high performance, low latency service. It does not offer any form of caching or recursive service, and notably does not support DNSSEC. There's a strong focus on making the code efficient, lean, and resilient. The code has a decent regression testsuite with full branch coverage on the core packet parsing and generation code, and some scripted QA tools for e.g. valgrind validation, clang-analyzer, etc. The geographically-aware features also support the emerging EDNS Client Subnet draft for receiving more-precise network location information from intermediate shared caches.