Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – cfenollosa.com/misc/tricks.txt – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – MNX.io – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.
  • Vim Awesome – AWESOME VIM PLUGINS from ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Bookmarks for 6 mag 2014 through 15 mag 2014

These are my links for 6 mag 2014 through 15 mag 2014:

  • Send ePub to Kindle – What is my Send-to-Kindle email address? Your Send-to-Kindle email address is a unique email address assigned to your Kindle device or reading app when it is registered. Each Kindle device or reading app has its own email address. These email addresses will always end with “@kindle.com”, and supported files sent to them will automatically appear in your Kindle library.
  • redsocks – transparent socks redirector – This tool allows you to redirect any TCP connection to SOCKS or HTTPS proxy using your firewall, so redirection is system-wide. Why is that useful? I can suggest following reasons: you use tor and don't want any TCP connection to leak you use DVB ISP and this ISP provides internet connectivity with some special daemon that may be also called "Internet accelerator" and this accelerator acts as proxy. Globax is example of such an accelerator Linux/iptables, OpenBSD/pf and FreeBSD/ipfw are supported. Linux/iptables is well-tested, other implementations may have bugs, your bugreports are welcome.
  • Unbound – Unbound is a validating, recursive, and caching DNS resolver. The C implementation of Unbound is developed and maintained by NLnet Labs. It is based on ideas and algorithms taken from a java prototype developed by Verisign labs, Nominet, Kirei and ep.net. Unbound is designed as a set of modular components, so that also DNSSEC (secure DNS) validation and stub-resolvers (that do not run as a server, but are linked into an application) are easily possible. The source code is under a BSD License.

Bookmarks for 18 apr 2014 through 30 apr 2014

These are my links for 18 apr 2014 through 30 apr 2014:

  • JoshData/mailinabox · GitHub – Mail-in-a-Box helps individuals take back control of their email by defining a one-click, easy-to-deploy SMTP+everything else server: a mail server in a box.
  • SSH Multi-hop Connections With Netcat Mode Proxy | Click & Find Answer ! – Since OpenSSH 5.4 there is a new feature called natcat mode, which allows you to bind STDIN and STDOUT of local SSH client to a TCP port accessible through the remote SSH server. This mode is enabled by simply calling ssh -W [HOST]:[PORT] Theoretically this should be ideal for use in the ProxyCommand setting in per-host SSH configurations, which was previously often used with the nc (netcat) command. ProxyCommand allows you to configure a machine as proxy between you local machine and the target SSH server, for example if the target SSH server is hidden behind a firewall. The problem now is, that instead of working, it throws a cryptic error message in my face: Bad packet length 1397966893.Disconnecting: Packet corrupt
  • Tyblog | SSH Kung Fu – OpenSSH is an incredible tool. Though primarily relied upon as a secure alternative to plaintext remote tools like telnet or rsh, OpenSSH (hereafter referred to as plain old ssh) has become a swiss army knife of functionality for far more than just remote logins. I rely on ssh every day for multiple purposes and feel the need to share the love for this excellent tool. What follows is a list for some of my use cases that leverage the power of ssh.
  • Baseimage-docker: A minimal Ubuntu base image modified for Docker-friendliness – YOUR DOCKER IMAGE MIGHT BE BROKEN without you knowing it Learn the right way to build your Dockerfile.
  • NetApp – Index – The following documentation is a guide on using and configuring the NetApp servers, there is also a commandline cheat sheet. I have tried to make this section as brief as possible but still cover a broad range of information regarding the NetApp product but I point you to the Official NetApp web site which contains all the documentation you will ever need.

Bookmarks for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014

These are my links for 28 mar 2014 through 29 mar 2014:

  • LDAP org chart | bitcube.co.uk – For centralised authentication and authorisation, LDAP is the de-facto standard. Whether in its pure form on Unix or in Active Directory guise on Windows, everyone uses it. What many people don't realise is that you can store all sorts of useful (and not so useful) information in LDAP. One field which can be useful is the "manager" attribute. One of our customers use that and so we've written a small script to graph it using the excellent Graphviz tool. It will probably need customising for specific cases, however we hope that people find it useful nonetheless. If you want to alter the output, do have a look at the record format documentation.
  • Puppet errors explained | bitcube.co.uk – Puppet is a wonderful system automation tool, however the learning curve can be a little steep. We've collected some of the errors messages and "strange" behaviour you may come across together with explanations to help overcome these hurdles and boost adoption of this fabulous tool. If you have any useful errors and explanations, please do send them in and we'll update this article.
  • SCAP: Guide To The Secure Configuration of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 – This guide has been created to assist IT professionals, in effectively securing systems with Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.
  • DNS Load Balancing and Using Multiple Load Balancers in the Cloud – [...] Load balancing in general is a complicated process, but there's some secret sauce in managing DNS along with multiple load balancers in the cloud. It requires that you draw from a few different sets of networking and “cloudy” concepts. In this second article in my best practices series (my first post covered how to use credentials within RightScale for storing sensitive or frequently used values), I'll explain how to set up load balancers to build a fault-tolerant, highly available web application in the cloud. Here's what you’ll need: Multiple A records for a host name in the DNS service of your choice Multiple load balancers to protect against failure [...]
  • gdnsd – gdnsd is an Authoritative-only DNS server which does geographic (or other sorts of) balancing, redirection, weighting, and service-state-conscious failover at the DNS layer. gdnsd is written in C using libev and pthreads with a focus on high performance, low latency service. It does not offer any form of caching or recursive service, and notably does not support DNSSEC. There's a strong focus on making the code efficient, lean, and resilient. The code has a decent regression testsuite with full branch coverage on the core packet parsing and generation code, and some scripted QA tools for e.g. valgrind validation, clang-analyzer, etc. The geographically-aware features also support the emerging EDNS Client Subnet draft for receiving more-precise network location information from intermediate shared caches.