Bookmarks for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015

These are my links for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015:

  • My Blog: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: Basic Configuration – Our goal: Create an Auto Scaling EC2 Group in a single Availability Zone and use a HTTP status page as a Health Monitor for our Load Balancer and the Auto Scaling group instances. This exercise will show us some Auto Scaling basics and will be useful to understand the concepts beneath but the Auto Scaling Group will not automatically "scale" responding to external influence like Average CPU Usage or Total Apache Connections (This aspect is covered in this post: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: External CloudWatch Metric). With the Auto Scaling configuration described here, we will obtain a web server cluster that can be increased and decreased in members with a simple Auto Scaling API call and we will transfer the monitoring role to the ELB to automatically replace failed EC2 instances or web servers.
  • Autoscaling with custom metrics « That’s Geeky – One of the appeals of cloud computing is the idea of using what you need when you need. One of the ways that Amazon provides for this is through autoscaling. In essence, this allows you to vary the number of (related) running instances according to some metric that is being tracked. In this article, we look at how you can trigger a change in the number of running instances using a custom Cloudwatch metric – including the setup of said metric, and a brief look at the interactions between the various autoscaling commands used.
  • Painless AWS Auto Scaling With EBS Snapshots And Capistrano – Boom – AWS (Amazon Web Services) auto scaling is a simple concept on the surface: You get an AMI, set up rules, and the load balancer takes care of the rest. However, actually getting it done is more complicated. Some choices are worse than others: you could bake an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) before you deploy, but that could add 10 minutes or more to each deployment. Some are dangerous: you could create an AMI after each deploy, but you run the risk that an auto scale even happens before your AMIs are done. Plus, you have a whole variety of AMIs deployed in at any given time. Some are similar to what we propose in this tutorial: you could push your code to S3 on each deploy and have user-data scripts that pull it down on each auto scaling event. However you slice it, to get auto scaling to fit into your development work flow in a transparent way takes careful thought and planning. We recently rolled out the following solution at CodePen. It keeps our AMIs static and our application ready for scaling on EBS (Elastic Block Store) snapshots. We can push code using Capistrano and let a few scripts distribute the ever-changing code base to our fleet of servers. I’d like to share the steps required to make it work. This series of posts will walk you through the steps required to build an auto-scaling infrastructure that stays out of your way.
  • : establishing geek cred since 1305712800 – Did you accidentally set node.normal[:foo][:bar] = 'something bad' in your chef recipe? Then you found that the node's normal attributes persisted between chef runs, and you really wanted to use the default attribute precedence level in your cookbook's attributes/default.rb file?

Bookmarks for 2 set 2014 through 3 set 2014

These are my links for 2 set 2014 through 3 set 2014:

  • Overview – The Apache James Project delivers a rich set of open source modules and libraries, written in Java, related to Internet mail communication which build into an advanced enterprise mail server.
  • Archiveopteryx – Archiveopteryx stores email in a database and provides access to it through IMAP and more.
  • Fluentd | Open Source Data Collector – Fluentd is an open source data collector for unified logging layer. Fluentd allows you to unify data collection and consumption for a better use and understanding of data.

Bookmarks for 30 lug 2014 through 5 ago 2014

These are my links for 30 lug 2014 through 5 ago 2014:

Bookmarks for 23 dic 2010 through 3 gen 2011

These are my links for 23 dic 2010 through 3 gen 2011:

  • How to Survive a Slashdotting on a Small Apache Server – …so your plain ordinary webserver just got listed on a high-traffic news site.  Slashdot?  Reddit?  Hacker News?  Well done, turns out you’re hosting something thousands of people want to read.  Now thousands of people want to come to your webserver at once… […]
  • WordPress, tutto sul file wp-config.php – […] La documentazione ufficiale di WordPress dedica una intera pagina al file wp-config.php. Si tratta del file di configurazione che permette al sito di collegarsi al database. Di regola è sufficiente impostare solamente i parametri per la connessione, le chiavi di sicurezza, il prefisso per le tabelle nel caso di installazioni multiple sullo stesso database, e della localizzazione nella propria lingua, ma è possibile anche impostare altri parametri per personalizzare ulteriormente la propria installazione di WordPress. Vediamo come […] 
  • 500 Internal Server Error – 500 Internal Server Error