Bookmarks for 29 ago 2014 through 1 set 2014

These are my links for 29 ago 2014 through 1 set 2014:

  • Scaling PHP apps via PHP-FPM clustering | Jamie Alquiza – PHP-FPM is a way to move your busted PHP handling from one place to another. It's essentially a pool of processes ready for PHP interpretation through FastCGI. While Apache will service client connections and static content, PHP requests are pushed into PHP-FPM. PHP-FPM allows the creation of process pools, each pool having it's own spawning model (e.g. static number of processes, dynamic with min/max, etc.) and other configurations (what UID/GID to run as, listening socket, etc.). A typical setup would be to create a PHP-FPM pool per tenant in a shared hosting environment.
  • KERMIT – KermIT is an opensource IT management solution. KermIT integrates best of breed opensource components with a Web user interface and dashboard to provide a central management solution for IT systems and applications. It provides a consistent, secure framework and a scalable architecture. It manages Linux, Unix and Windows systems. 'Small picture' KermIT relies in the backend on Puppet and MCollective. The license of the developments is the GPL v.3 for the generic part of the source code.
  • Random Start Times For Cron Jobs With Puppet : – Periodic scripts which use a common resource can end up being configured to run at the same time for multiple hosts. The result is that tasks like puppet runs or backups can take longer since they are trying to run all at once instead of being staggered. One way to do this is to give each cron task unique times manually. Another way is to add a random sleep before the task runs. My preferred way is to use the fqdn_rand function in puppet. Here's how it works.

Bookmarks for 23 feb 2011 through 28 feb 2011

These are my links for 23 feb 2011 through 28 feb 2011:

  • Openfiler 2.3 Active/Passive Cluster (heartbeat,DRBD) With … – […] Openfiler is a Linux based NAS/SAN application which can deliver storage over nfs/smb/iscsi and ftp. It has a web interface over that you can control these services. The howto is based on the Howto from Kyle Gililland. A lot of thanks to him for this.<br />
    The cluster we build will consist of two nodes replicating each other and taking over services and storage in case of emergency. Furthermore we have an Offsite Replication Server, which ideally stands in a physically different position and replicates the configurations/storage from which ever node is active. In case of emergency this Offsite Replication Server can be used to restore the cluster and to deliver the services […]
  • Using m4 with Nagios: Advanced Ideas – Nagios configuration has been traditionally cumbersome and extensive; there are a lot of things to configure. The addition of templating some time ago helped, but not entirely. A configuration element such as a server or a switch can take up a huge amount of configuration and be quite repetitive, too.Using m4 can alleviate all of these problems. When combined with GNU Make and Nagios configuration directories, changing the configuration can be done quite simply and easily.
  • – RANDOM.ORG offers true random numbers to anyone on the Internet. The randomness comes from atmospheric noise, which for many purposes is better than the pseudo-random number algorithms typically used in computer programs. People use RANDOM.ORG for holding drawings, lotteries and sweepstakes, to drive games and gambling sites, for scientific applications and for art and music. The service has existed since 1998 and was built and is being operated by Mads Haahr of the School of Computer Science and Statistics at Trinity College, Dublin in Ireland.<br />
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