Bookmarks for 1 nov 2014 from 22:12 to 22:21

These are my links for 1 nov 2014 from 22:12 to 22:21:

  • carlhuda’s janus at master – GitHub – This is a distribution of plug-ins and mappings for Vim, Gvim and MacVim. It is designed to provide minimal working environment using the most popular plug-ins and the most common mappings. The distribution is completely customisable using a ~/.vimrc.before and ~/.vimrc.after Vim RC files.
  • Lokaltog/powerline – Powerline is a statusline plugin for vim, and provides statuslines and prompts for several other applications, including zsh, bash, tmux, IPython, Awesome and Qtile.
  • tmuxinator/tmuxinator – Manage complex tmux sessions easily
  • creaktive/rainbarf · GitHub – CPU/RAM/battery stats chart bar for tmux (and GNU screen)

Bookmarks for 7 ago 2014 from 14:07 to 14:40

These are my links for 7 ago 2014 from 14:07 to 14:40:

  • Adagios by opinkerfi – Adagios is a web based Nagios configuration interface built to be simple and intuitive in design, exposing less of the clutter under the hood of nagios. Additionally adagios has a rest interface for both status and configuration data as well a feature complete status interface that can be used as an alternative to nagios web interface.
  • – An open source email archiving and e-discovery solution.
  • Sensu | The open source monitoring framework. – […] Sensu is often described as the “monitoring router”. Essentially, Sensu takes the results of “check” scripts run across many systems, and if certain conditions are met; passes their information to one or more “handlers”. Checks are used, for example, to determine if a service like Apache is up or down. Checks can also be used to collect data, such as MySQL query statistics or Rails application metrics. Handlers take actions, using result information, such as sending an email, messaging a chat room, or adding a data point to a graph. There are several types of handlers, but the most common and most powerful is “pipe”, a script that receives data via standard input. Check and handler scripts can be written in any language, and the community repository continues to grow! […]
  • Check_MK – Welcome to the official Homepage of the Check_MK-Project. Check_MK is a collection of extensions for the IT-Monitoring-Kernel of Nagios and together with this, and ideally also with PNP4Nagios and NagVis constitutes a complete IT-Monitoring-System. Check_MK is 100% Open-Source and is available under the terms of the GNU GPL.
  • open source email archiving solution – Welcome to piler, an advanced open source email archiver Piler is an open source email archiving solution with all the necessary features for your enterprise.

Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.

Bookmarks for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014

These are my links for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014:

  • Ralentir le débit de postfix pour wanadoo/orange – Le blog de Michauko – Si vous avez un serveur d’envoi de mails (je ne parle pas d’être un spammeur) et beaucoup d’abonnés chez Wanadoo et Orange, vous risquez fort le rejet temporaire de votre serveur si le débit d’envoi est trop fort. C’est ce qui m’est arrivé et hop, 5000 mails entassés dans la file de postfix.
  • refused to talk to me: postfix solution | – Orange sadly limits inbound connexion to it’s MX to 1 connexion per IP, which is a total pain in the ass when you try to deliver newsletter, or manage a MTA. Here is a sample log from their MX: Jul 4 10:42:42 postfix/smtp[32347]: 0123456789: host[] refused to talk to me: 421 mwinf5c34 ME Trop de connexions, veuillez verifier votre configuration. Too many connections, slow down. OFR004_104 [104] However, since they won’t change anything, we have to take mesures, here’s what you can do if you run postfix: you have to set a per-destination concurrency limit.
  • Aral Balkan: Historical Archive — How to revert (roll back) to a previous revision with Subversion – Here, then, is a very simple, plain English explanation of how to revert to a previous version of your application in Subversion, to help anyone who may be starting out with it and is lost.
  • Tmux: A Simple Start – In all likelihood, you’ve probably already heard of tmux. However, you may not be using it everyday. If tmux is on your “Someday” list because you think it is too complicated (I mean, c’mon, the word “multiplexer” is just plain scary), then I am here to show you just how easy it is to put tmux into your workflow.
  • Tyblog | Yet Another Vim Setup – Vim is an excellent text editor. I’ve used it for many years and like most vim users, have collected a fairly large collection of settings in my .vimrc and learned how to grok my vim usage effectively through a lot of trial and error. To that end, I’ve tried to assemble a useful overview of my experience with vim.