Bookmarks for 22 mag 2015 through 29 mag 2015

These are my links for 22 mag 2015 through 29 mag 2015:

  • Reducing PDF file-size in Linux | The Road to Elysium – The other day I downloaded a PDF that ended up being a whole lot bigger than I thought. A “whopping” 230MB, which is another deal compared to the 30MB PDF’s that I’m accustomed to. So how to reduce the file-size? Ghostscript to the rescue!
  • Automate tmux sessions with tmuxinator – For those of us who spend a lot of time at a terminal, tmux is almost always part of our standard arsenal of tools. In my quest to make tmux a little more flexible, I came across tmuxinator today.
  • About ShellCheck – ShellCheck is a static analysis and linting tool for sh/bash scripts. It's mainly focused on handling typical beginner and intermediate level syntax errors and pitfalls where the shell just gives a cryptic error message or strange behavior, but it also reports on a few more advanced issues where corner cases can cause delayed failures.

Bookmarks for 15 mag 2015 through 17 mag 2015

These are my links for 15 mag 2015 through 17 mag 2015:

Bookmarks for 13 feb 2015 through 15 feb 2015

These are my links for 13 feb 2015 through 15 feb 2015:

  • Search for property information from Land Registry – GOV.UK – Find information about a property in England or Wales, even if you don’t own it. Search by address to find the owner, how far its general boundaries extend and whether it’s at risk of flooding.
  • London Rents map | London City Hall – The London Rents Map shows average private sector rents for different types of home across London. Search the Rents Map by entering a location and a property type in the box below. The data on average rents is given at postcode district level (SW19 or E7, for example), and is based on a sample covering the last 12 months (up to the date shown in the last update box) so does not fully reflect the most recent short-term trends in the market.
  • Wineskin: play your favorite Windows games on Mac OS X without needing Microsoft Windows | Wineskin, Play your favorite Windows games on Mac OS X without needing Microsoft Windows – Wineskin is a tool used to make ports of Windows software to Mac OS X.  The ports are in the form of normal Mac application bundle wrappers.  It works like a wrapper around the Windows software, and you can share just the wrappers if you choose. Best of all, its free!   Make ports/wrappers to share with others, make ports of your own open source, free, or commercial software, or just make a port for yourself!  Why install and use Windows if you don’t need to?
  • Liberio | Simple eBook creation and publishing. – No more complicated exports or data handling with ePub files. Create your own eBooks for free with only one click right from the cloud or your computer, and start publishing with Liberio.
  • Writer2ePub – Writer2ePub (W2E) is an extension for or LibreOffice which allows you to create an ePub file from any file format that Writer can read. You can easily generate an ePub of professional quality that you can edit with the appropriate ePub-authoring tools later. Moreover, W2E fixes several formatting errors and generates by default a logical layout, in line with the traditional editorial standards.

Bookmarks for 3 dic 2014 from 13:03 to 13:41

These are my links for 3 dic 2014 from 13:03 to 13:41:

  • git-flow cheatsheet – git-flow are a set of git extensions to provide high-level repository operations for Vincent Driessen's branching model. more This cheatsheet shows the basic usage and effect of git-flow operations
  • Voluntary – […] Our goal is to create open source software that promotes freedom of expression, privacy and the decentralization of power with an eye towards usability […] (Just for OSX at the moment)
  • A Visual Git Reference – This page gives brief, visual reference for the most common commands in git. Once you know a bit about how git works, this site may solidify your understanding.
  • SSH_VPN – Community Help Wiki – This page discusses using SSH to set up SSH-based point to point connections, which can then be used to create routes that create virtual private networks. Note that using SSH in this fashion is not the "best" way to create a permanent, stable VPN. Notably, SSH uses TCP, and TCP over TCP can provide abysmal performance under pathological conditions.
  • VPN over SSH – This how-to is intended to cover the details of how to establish a VPN (Virtual Private Network) over a SSH connection. Starting with open-ssh 4.3, you can now use a ssh connection to set up a VPN. This is technically termed "layer-3 IP-in-SSH tunnelling" and is not using ssh to port forward (ssh -L ) or create a dynamic "application level" forwarding (SOCKS) (ssh -D ). Rather a VPN is established using a SSH connection to create a virtual interface, tun0. Advantages : IMO, this technique is easier to set up then openvpn, especially if you are using a single client. Works with most Linux distributions without the need to install any additional software on the clients. The server only needs openssh-server. This protocol uses udp to transmit tunneled tcp connections resulting in a more stable connection compared with port forwarding (using ssh with the -L or -D options). Disadvantages : As of yet I do not know of a windows client which will use this protocol. If you are needing to set up a VPN with numerous clients I would use openvpn. Although there are several "how-to's" on the web, most of them assume you know something about networking and routing. This page attempts to explain some of the "missing details".