Bookmarks for 28 ago 2014 from 09:32 to 11:55

These are my links for 28 ago 2014 from 09:32 to 11:55:

  • Keepalived for Linux – Keepalived is a routing software written in C. The main goal of this project is to provide simple and robust facilities for loadbalancing and high-availability to Linux system and Linux based infrastructures. Loadbalancing framework relies on well-known and widely used Linux Virtual Server (IPVS) kernel module providing Layer4 loadbalancing. Keepalived implements a set of checkers to dynamically and adaptively maintain and manage loadbalanced server pool according their health. On the other hand high-availability is achieved by VRRP protocol. VRRP is a fundamental brick for router failover. In addition, Keepalived implements a set of hooks to the VRRP finite state machine providing low-level and high-speed protocol interactions. Keepalived frameworks can be used independently or all together to provide resilient infrastructures.
  • The BIRD Internet Routing Daemon Project – BIRD is an Internet Routing Daemon designed to avoid all of these shortcomings, to support all the routing technology used in the today's Internet or planned to be used in near future and to have a clean extensible architecture allowing new routing protocols to be incorporated easily. Among other features, BIRD supports: * both IPv4 and IPv6 protocols * multiple routing tables * the Border Gateway Protocol (BGPv4) * the Routing Information Protocol (RIPv2) * the Open Shortest Path First protocol (OSPFv2, OSPFv3) * the Router Advertisements for IPv6 hosts a virtual protocol for exchange of routes between different routing tables on a single host a command-line interface allowing on-line control and inspection of status of the daemon soft reconfiguration[…]
  • How to make MaxScale High Available with Corosync/Pacemaker | MariaDB – MaxScale, an open-source database-centric router for MySQL and MariaDB makes High Availability possible by hiding the complexity of backends and masking failures. MaxScale itself however is a single application running in a Linux box between the client application and the databases – so how do we make MaxScale High Available? This blog post shows how to quickly setup a Pacemaker/Corosync environment and configure MaxScale as a managed cluster resource.

Bookmarks for 25 apr 2011 from 14:21 to 16:07

These are my links for 25 apr 2011 from 14:21 to 16:07:

  • A TCP Proxy in Perl – good coders code, great reuse – Several weeks ago my friend Madars was in an airport in the Netherlands and he wanted to login into his server via ssh. It turned out that their public internet had only ports 80 and 443 open so he couldn't do that. He asked me if I could proxy either port 80 or 443 to his server. Surely, I had a solution. I modified the tcp proxy server that I had written for my Turn any Linux computer into SOCKS5 proxy in one command article and did:<br />
    sudo ./ 443<br />
  • IPv6 Crash Course For Linux | – […] You might be used to working with IPv4 on Linux, but like it or not IPv6 is on its way in. Roll up your sleeves, spit on your palms, and get ready to go to work because this is your crash course in actually using IPv6. It hardly hurts at all. Linux has supported it since the 2.1 kernel, so you shouldn't have to install anything. Make sure you have the ping6, ip, and ifconfig commands. […]
  • Another IPv6 Crash Course For Linux: Real IPv6 Addresses … – […] In the first IPv6 for Linux crash course, we covered some of the bare basics of IPv6 on Linux. Today we're going to learn how to use routable IPv6 addresses, some iptables rules to keep our experimentation from leaking out into the world, and about implementing DNS in IPv6 […]