Archivio tag: howto

Bookmarks for 17 ott 2014 through 20 ott 2014

These are my links for 17 ott 2014 through 20 ott 2014:

  • microHOWTO: Configure Apache to use Kerberos authentication – To configure Apache to use Kerberos authentication Kerberos is an authentication protocol that supports the concept of Single Sign-On (SSO). Having authenticated once at the start of a session, users can access network services throughout a Kerberos realm without authenticating again. For this to work it is necessary to use network protocols that are Kerberos-aware. In the case of HTTP, support for Kerberos is usually provided using the SPNEGO authentication mechanism (Simple and Protected GSS-API Negotiation). This is also known as ‘integrated authentication’ or ‘negotiate authentication’. Apache does not itself support SPNEGO, but support can be added by means of the mod_auth_kerb authentication module.
  • How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X | Ubuntu – [...] Note: this procedure requires that you create an .img file from the .iso file you download. It will also change the filesystem that is on the USB stick to make it bootable, so backup all data before continuing [...]
  • thomastk/kunjumon – Kunjumon is a framework that can be used to create plugins for Nagios monitoring system, without writing any new code. The plugins thus created are robust, and, can monitor complex scenarios by querying data from multiple databases. While efforts to build such plugins would require considerable scripting work, using Kunjumon framework, a a plugin that pulls input data from databases can be implemented by defining it in XML format, and, there is no need to write any code to support it. The Kunjumon framework has been tested on all the Linux platforms, and against MySQL, Postgres, Oracle and Microsoft SQL Server. However, in general, it would work with any ODBC interface configured on the Nagios host to access a data repository.

Bookmarks for 26 ago 2014 through 27 ago 2014

These are my links for 26 ago 2014 through 27 ago 2014:

  • Regular Expressions – Regular expressions ("regexes") are supercharged Find/Replace string operations. Regular expressions are used when editing text in a text editor, to: check whether the text contains a certain pattern find those pattern matches, if there are any pull information (i.e. substrings) out of the text make modifications to the text. As well as text editors, almost every high-level programming language includes support for regular expressions. In this context "the text" is just a string variable, but the operations available are the same. Some programming languages (Perl, JavaScript) even provide dedicated syntax for regular expression operations.
  • MySQL active-passive cluster | Your IT goes Linux – We will use the iSCSI Lun defined in our iSCSI cluster as a shared storage and we will run MySQL in active-passive (fail-over) mode using Pacemaker and Corosync cluster engine. The cluster will have to connect to the iSCSI target, mount the iSCSI partition on one node and start a MySQL service which has all its data on this partition.
  • Perl – [...] Perl has horrors, but it also has some great redeeming features. In this respect it is like every other programming language ever created. This document is intended to be informative, not evangelical. It is aimed at people who, like me: dislike the official Perl documentation at http://perl.org/ for being intensely technical and giving far too much space to very unusual edge cases learn new programming languages most quickly by "axiom and example" wish Larry Wall would get to the point already know how to program in general terms don't care about Perl beyond what's necessary to get the job done. This document is intended to be as short as possible, but no shorter[...]
  • Linux Performance – This page links to various Linux performance material I've created, including the tools maps on the right, which show: Linux observability tools, Linux benchmarking tools, Linux tuning tools, and Linux observability sar. For more diagrams, see my slide decks below.
  • AIXchange: Useful Storage Links – Here's an assortment of really good storage-related articles — the majority of which are found on IBM developerWorks — that are worth your time. While some of them are a few years old, they still provide relevant information.

Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – cfenollosa.com/misc/tricks.txt – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – MNX.io – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.
  • Vim Awesome – AWESOME VIM PLUGINS from ACROSS THE UNIVERSE

Bookmarks for 4 giu 2014 through 18 giu 2014

These are my links for 4 giu 2014 through 18 giu 2014: