Bookmarks for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014

These are my links for 8 lug 2014 through 11 lug 2014:

  • Tips & Tricks for the Command line of Linux – – I have marked with a * those which I think are absolutely essential Items for each section are sorted by oldest to newest. Come back soon for more!
  • Naming Schemes – A good naming scheme is scalable, unique, and easy to remember. The purpose of these naming schemes is to name networked servers, wireless access points or client computers, but it can also be used to name projects, products, variables, streets, pets, kids, or any other project where unique names and rememberable names are required.
  • SSD Cloud Hosting & VPS – – Here at MNX, we’ve been busy setting up a brand new data center for our cloud hosted services. We started off as a consulting company providing managed Linux services, which means we have been exposed to a ton of different customer environments and an equal number of schemes for naming equipment…not all of them good. It’s a problem that goes back as far as computers have existed, and everyone has their own opinion on the “best” way to name hosts. Most methods start out fine at the beginning, but quickly become unwieldy as infrastructure expands and adapts over time.
  • Trello – Organize anything, together. Trello is a collaboration tool that organizes your projects into boards. In one glance, know what's being worked on, who's working on what, and where something is in a process.

Bookmarks for 8 nov 2011 from 15:36 to 21:57

These are my links for 8 nov 2011 from 15:36 to 21:57:

  • 10 Ruby One Liners to Impress Your Friends – Someone came up with a list of 10 one-liner examples that are meant to showcase Scala’s expressiveness. A CoffeeScript version quickly emerged, so I thought I’d publish a Ruby one. I find Ruby’s syntax to be a bit cleaner than Scala’s, but the substance (at least as far as these examples are concerned) is relatively similar.
  • Ruby development for system administrators | Linux User – Most Linux and UNIX system administrators use a diverse mix of shell scripts and tools like grep, awk, cut and so on. The classical approach has proven its merits, but these scripts are generally not easy to read or to maintain. One solution is to use a real programming language for system administration tasks. In a complex environment, system administration can become much easier with a real programming language instead of shell scripts. Traditionally, Perl has been very popular among sysadmins, but some people maintain that this is not much better than shell.

    In this article, we choose Ruby, a feature-rich but simple object-oriented programming language known from the popular web application framework Ruby on Rails. T

    [ Ruby! Ruby! Ruby! ]

  • Modern Perl, by chromatic – Onyx Neon Press – Modern Perl is one way to describe how experienced and effective Perl 5 programmers work. They use language idioms. They take advantage of the CPAN. They're recognizably Perlish, and they show good taste and craftsmanship and a full understanding of Perl.

    You can learn this too, whether you've dabbled with Perl for a decade or someone just handed you this book and said "Fix this code by Friday."

  • Useful commands for Windows administrators – Managing a Windows 2000 Active Directory with about 100 servers, over 1500 computers and 35 sites, the following commands often helped me answer questions or solve problems.
    Most commands are "one-liners", but for some I had to make an exception and go to the right directory first.

    These commands could all be used in batch files, though some may need some "parsing" with FOR /F to retrieve only the required substrings from the displayed information.

  • I tool "segreti" per aumentare la sicurezza di Windows – Non tutti sanno dell’esistenza di un set di strumenti che, avviati dalla linea di comando, consentono una gestione puntuale di diversi aspetti di security[…]

    E non solo 😉

Bookmarks for 11 nov 2010 through 16 nov 2010

These are my links for 11 nov 2010 through 16 nov 2010:

  • FTTH look ahead — technologies & architectures – Abstract: We review the trade-offs, challenges and potentials of various FTTH architecture options<br />
    A presentation by Google
  • vitetris: Text-mode Tetris for Linux – vitetris is a terminal-based Tetris clone by Victor Nilsson. Gameplay is much like the early Tetris games by Nintendo. Features include:<br />
    <br />
    Configurable keys<br />
    Highscore table<br />
    Two-player mode with garbage<br />
    Network play<br />
    Joystick (gamepad) support on Linux or with Allegro<br />
    It has been tested on Linux, NetBSD and a few other Unix-like systems, and ported to Windows and DOS. Library dependencies are minimal (only libc is required), and many features can be disabled at compile-time.<br />
    <br />
    [ via ]
  • Hacker’s Wisdom

Bookmarks for 20 set 2010 through 23 set 2010

These are my links for 20 set 2010 through 23 set 2010:

  • | domain name generator – Are you looking for a domain name for your startup or project? Or maybe you are looking for your comapny name?<br />
    Try – a simple domain name generator. Just type one or two keywords, choose settings and mix them up! Also, you can check the domain availability. If it is available, you can purchase it!
  • 20+ .htaccess Hacks Every Web Developer Should Know About | DevMoose – […] Apache's .htaccess(hypertext access) configuration file can be a very powerful tool in a web developer's toolkit if used properly. It can be found in the webroot of your server and can be easily edited using any text editor. In this article I'm going to show you 20 .htaccess hacks and how to use them.<br />
    Before I start with this article I'd like to start by saying that abusing the .htaccess file will hurt the performance of your website. The .htaccess file should only be used if you have no other way to achieve certain things.<br />
    Make sure to back up your current .htaccess file before applying any of the following hacks. […]<br />
    <br />
  • Keeping an eye on TSM volumes – […] I wrote a quick script which tells me when volumes in TSM (Tivoli Storage Manager) have access and/or media issues and shoots me off an email. The script does two things:<br />
    1) Checks for volumes which are NOT in the states READWRITE or OFFSITE.<br />
    2) Checks for volumes which have a read/write error count >0.<br />
    I’m sure that most people running TSM in their environment have some sort of daily reporting that gets sent out. If that’s the case, you can simply extract the SQL from the script and use it in your own reporting tools.<br />
  • Read Ruby 1.9: Free Ebook About the Ruby Programming Language – Very early draft of a book about version 1.9 of the Ruby programming language, released under a Creative Commons license.<br />
    <br />
    [via Bru Blogs Aggregator ]
  • Know Your UNIX System Administrator: A Field Guide – There are four major species of Unix sysad…<br />
    Esilarante 🙂