Bookmarks for 1 Mar 2016 through 8 Mar 2016

These are my links for 1 Mar 2016 through 8 Mar 2016:

  • – This books should become a reference for how doing cool things in your daily business with Ansible, things you can not find in the official docs.
  • Ansible Cheat Sheet | – Ansible is the cool, new kid on the block that is IT automation. So, just in case you need an Ansible Cheat Sheet, we’ve got you covered
  • zorangagic/awsinfo – Daily Inventory of all AWS resources in excel format
  • High availability clustering on AWS | Zoran’s Blog – How do we keep legacy applications highly available on AWS? I have already written about this previously and there are many good alternatives with the upcoming Cloudwatch instance recovery the easiest to implement. Yet Cloudwatch instance recovery or autoscaling group with min=1,max=1 still requires failure to be detected (1-2 mins) and new instance to be booted up (2-3 mins). If the application can not tolerate outage of 3-5 minutes then high availability clustering may be a good alternative
  • jordansissel/pleaserun: An attempt to abstract this “init” script madness. – Pleaserun is a tool to generate startup scripts for the wasteland of sorrow that is process launchers.

Bookmarks for 16 giu 2015 through 19 giu 2015

These are my links for 16 giu 2015 through 19 giu 2015:

  • 10 Things You Should Know About AWS – High Scalability – – Ahead of the upcoming 2nd annual re:Invent conference, inspired by Simone Brunozzi’s recent presentation at an AWS Meetup in San Francisco, and collected from a few of my recent consulting engagements, I’ve compiled a list of 10 useful time and clock-tick saving tips about AWS.
  • IT Landscape for sysadmins
  • MonitoringScape – The past decade has seen a dramatic shift in how we build applications: clouds, containers and micro-services have displaced the old paradigm of static, monolithic infrastructure. The need for operational visibility has grown tenfold. Thankfully, the monitoring landscape has kept up with the times. We now have a choice of over 100 monitoring tools that provide excellent visibility to every nook and cranny of our IT stack. The modern monitoring landscape has something for everyone: on-prem installations, SaaS applications, open-source tools and high-priced enterprise monitoring suites. However, with so many tools to choose from, the monitoring landscape can be difficult to navigate. MonitoringScape is your guide to the new, exciting world of modern monitoring. Keep in mind that this is a community resource, so your comments and suggestions are very welcome.
  • Provision and Bootstrap AWS instances with Chef – This is continuation of the previous post called Provision with Chef – baby steps. Today we going to talk about the process of bootstrapping instances with Chef used by FastCompany
  • Provision machines with AWS – custom bootsrapper – […] Now I will tell a little more about our instance bootstrap process. Basically at the end of the previous post we discussed tree possible options for automated machine startup: Create different AMI for each server role. Install all binaries into one ami an provide a way to load dynamic configs parts through some custom bootstrap script. Use infrastructure automation framework like Chef or Puppet, which could handle installs and configuration for you. […] [ Note: the article is pre chef-provisioning tool ]

Bookmarks for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015

These are my links for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015:

  • My Blog: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: Basic Configuration – Our goal: Create an Auto Scaling EC2 Group in a single Availability Zone and use a HTTP status page as a Health Monitor for our Load Balancer and the Auto Scaling group instances. This exercise will show us some Auto Scaling basics and will be useful to understand the concepts beneath but the Auto Scaling Group will not automatically "scale" responding to external influence like Average CPU Usage or Total Apache Connections (This aspect is covered in this post: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: External CloudWatch Metric). With the Auto Scaling configuration described here, we will obtain a web server cluster that can be increased and decreased in members with a simple Auto Scaling API call and we will transfer the monitoring role to the ELB to automatically replace failed EC2 instances or web servers.
  • Autoscaling with custom metrics « That’s Geeky – One of the appeals of cloud computing is the idea of using what you need when you need. One of the ways that Amazon provides for this is through autoscaling. In essence, this allows you to vary the number of (related) running instances according to some metric that is being tracked. In this article, we look at how you can trigger a change in the number of running instances using a custom Cloudwatch metric – including the setup of said metric, and a brief look at the interactions between the various autoscaling commands used.
  • Painless AWS Auto Scaling With EBS Snapshots And Capistrano – Boom – AWS (Amazon Web Services) auto scaling is a simple concept on the surface: You get an AMI, set up rules, and the load balancer takes care of the rest. However, actually getting it done is more complicated. Some choices are worse than others: you could bake an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) before you deploy, but that could add 10 minutes or more to each deployment. Some are dangerous: you could create an AMI after each deploy, but you run the risk that an auto scale even happens before your AMIs are done. Plus, you have a whole variety of AMIs deployed in at any given time. Some are similar to what we propose in this tutorial: you could push your code to S3 on each deploy and have user-data scripts that pull it down on each auto scaling event. However you slice it, to get auto scaling to fit into your development work flow in a transparent way takes careful thought and planning. We recently rolled out the following solution at CodePen. It keeps our AMIs static and our application ready for scaling on EBS (Elastic Block Store) snapshots. We can push code using Capistrano and let a few scripts distribute the ever-changing code base to our fleet of servers. I’d like to share the steps required to make it work. This series of posts will walk you through the steps required to build an auto-scaling infrastructure that stays out of your way.
  • : establishing geek cred since 1305712800 – Did you accidentally set node.normal[:foo][:bar] = 'something bad' in your chef recipe? Then you found that the node's normal attributes persisted between chef runs, and you really wanted to use the default attribute precedence level in your cookbook's attributes/default.rb file?

Bookmarks for 3 nov 2014 through 5 nov 2014

These are my links for 3 nov 2014 through 5 nov 2014:

  • Policy Daemon – Policyd is an anti-spam plugin for Postfix (written in C) that does Greylisting, Sender-(envelope, SASL or host / ip)-based throttling (on messages and/or volume per defined time unit), Recipient rate limiting, Spamtrap monitoring / blacklisting, HELO auto blacklisting and HELO randomization preventation.
  • DevStack – an OpenStack Community Production — documentation – A documented shell script to build complete OpenStack development environments. An OpenStack program maintained by the developer community. Setup a fresh supported Linux installation. Clone devstack from git clone Deploy your OpenStack Cloud cd devstack && ./
  • vim modeline – Tips and Tricks – ph3nix.Net – Generally you either love or hate Vim.  It boils down to a matter of personal preference.  However love or hate you have to admit it is extremely powerful for a command line, text only file editor.  For those who love it – or just have to make use of it on a regular basis, the Vim modeline feature is a very useful and powerful way of customizing the visual and editing preferences as well as several other options on a file by file basis.
  • Development Foo – using vim and sshfs to propel development | New Goliath
  • Front-end engineering and so on: OpenSSL: Convert private key to PEM format for AWS ELB – You might get message "Error: Invalid Private Key" while configuring SSL on Elastic Load Balancer on Amazon Web Services (AWS). It means your private key isn't in PEM format. No worries, it easy to fix.