Bookmarks for 3 Dic 2015 through 8 Dic 2015

These are my links for 3 Dic 2015 through 8 Dic 2015:

  • minio/mc · GitHub – Minio client (mc) provides a set of tools to work with Amazon S3 compatible cloud storage and filesystems. It has features to resume partial downloads, progress bar and parallel copy. Minio client is written in Golang and released under Apache license v2. [ via ]
  • Choosing an HTTP Status Code — Stop Making It Hard | Racksburg – What could be simpler than returning HTTP status codes? Did the page render? Great, return 200. Does the page not exist? That’s a 404. Do I want to redirect the user to another page? 302, or maybe 301.
  • Spinnaker: Global Continuous Delivery – Spinnaker is an open source, multi-cloud continuous delivery platform for releasing software changes with high velocity and confidence. It provides two core sets of features: cluster management and deployment management. Below we give a top-level overview of these features. [ via ]

Bookmarks for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015

These are my links for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015:

  • My Blog: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: Basic Configuration – Our goal: Create an Auto Scaling EC2 Group in a single Availability Zone and use a HTTP status page as a Health Monitor for our Load Balancer and the Auto Scaling group instances. This exercise will show us some Auto Scaling basics and will be useful to understand the concepts beneath but the Auto Scaling Group will not automatically "scale" responding to external influence like Average CPU Usage or Total Apache Connections (This aspect is covered in this post: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: External CloudWatch Metric). With the Auto Scaling configuration described here, we will obtain a web server cluster that can be increased and decreased in members with a simple Auto Scaling API call and we will transfer the monitoring role to the ELB to automatically replace failed EC2 instances or web servers.
  • Autoscaling with custom metrics « That’s Geeky – One of the appeals of cloud computing is the idea of using what you need when you need. One of the ways that Amazon provides for this is through autoscaling. In essence, this allows you to vary the number of (related) running instances according to some metric that is being tracked. In this article, we look at how you can trigger a change in the number of running instances using a custom Cloudwatch metric – including the setup of said metric, and a brief look at the interactions between the various autoscaling commands used.
  • Painless AWS Auto Scaling With EBS Snapshots And Capistrano – Boom – AWS (Amazon Web Services) auto scaling is a simple concept on the surface: You get an AMI, set up rules, and the load balancer takes care of the rest. However, actually getting it done is more complicated. Some choices are worse than others: you could bake an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) before you deploy, but that could add 10 minutes or more to each deployment. Some are dangerous: you could create an AMI after each deploy, but you run the risk that an auto scale even happens before your AMIs are done. Plus, you have a whole variety of AMIs deployed in at any given time. Some are similar to what we propose in this tutorial: you could push your code to S3 on each deploy and have user-data scripts that pull it down on each auto scaling event. However you slice it, to get auto scaling to fit into your development work flow in a transparent way takes careful thought and planning. We recently rolled out the following solution at CodePen. It keeps our AMIs static and our application ready for scaling on EBS (Elastic Block Store) snapshots. We can push code using Capistrano and let a few scripts distribute the ever-changing code base to our fleet of servers. I’d like to share the steps required to make it work. This series of posts will walk you through the steps required to build an auto-scaling infrastructure that stays out of your way.
  • : establishing geek cred since 1305712800 – Did you accidentally set node.normal[:foo][:bar] = 'something bad' in your chef recipe? Then you found that the node's normal attributes persisted between chef runs, and you really wanted to use the default attribute precedence level in your cookbook's attributes/default.rb file?

Bookmarks for 24 mar 2015 through 29 mar 2015

These are my links for 24 mar 2015 through 29 mar 2015:

  • Candlepin – Home – Candlepin is a collection of tools which allow companies to manage software subscriptions. The subscriptions allow users to access provided content over secure connections.
  • Rockhopper VPN: IPsec/IKEv2-based VPN software for Linux, implemented in user space. – Rockhopper VPN is IPsec/IKEv2-based VPN software based on modern design and considerations for Linux. All components of this VPN software are implemented in user space only, including the ESP protocol stack.
  • Taiga.Io | Agile, Open Source, Free Project Management System – Free. Open Source. Powerful. Taiga is a project management platform for startups and agile developers & designers who want a simple, beautiful tool that makes work truly enjoyable.
  • Git-ftp by git-ftp – I use git-ftp for my script based projects, mostly PHP. Most of the low-cost web hosting companies do not provide SSH or git support, but only FTP. That is why I needed an easy way to deploy my git tracked projects. Instead of transfering the whole project, I thought, why not only transfer the files that changed since the last time, git can tell me those files. Even if you are playing with different branches, git-ftp knows which files are different. No ordinary FTP client can do that. [ via ]
  • IE Supported Cipher Suites · client9/sslassert Wiki · GitHub – Summary: SSL cipher suite support on Internet Explorer depends both on the version of IE and on the version of the operating system. Internet Explorer 8 is crippled if it runs on Windows XP.

Bookmarks for 3 dic 2014 from 13:42 to 14:37

These are my links for 3 dic 2014 from 13:42 to 14:37: