Bookmarks for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014

These are my links for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014:

  • Inbox – The next-generation email platform – Inbox uses standard interfaces that you've come to expect from modern APIs. We've taken care of the bugs and edge-cases with character encodings, MIME structures, misformatted socket protocols, and more. Plus, your app will continue to "just work" over the same API as more providers are added.
  • RainLoop Webmail – Modest system requirements, decent performance, simple installation and upgrade, no database required – all these make RainLoop Webmail a perfect choice for your email solution. You are free to use RainLoop Webmail for your personal or non-profit projects.
  • LCMC – The LCMC is a GUI application that configures, manages and visualizes high-availability clusters. Specifically it manages clusters that use one or more of these components: Pacemaker, Corosync, Heartbeat, DRBD, KVM, XEN and LVM.
  • Index of /tig – Tig is an ncurses-based text-mode interface for git. It functions mainly as a Git repository browser, but can also assist in staging changes for commit at chunk level and act as a pager for output from various Git commands.
  • The World’s Most Powerful Browser-Based IDE – Codio – Codio is a powerful cloud and browser based IDE that covers the complete web development cycle; from prototype to deployment

Bookmarks for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014

These are my links for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014:

  • Babun | A windows shell you will love! – Would you like to use a linux-like console on a Windows host without a lot of fuzz? Try out babun!
  • OpenSSH – Wikibooks, open books for an open world – The OpenSSH suite provides secure remote access and file transfer. Since its initial release, it has grown to become the most widely used implementation of the SSH protocol. During the first ten years of its existence, ssh has largely replaced older corresponding unencrypted tools and protocols. The OpenSSH client is included by default in most operating system distributions, including OS X, Linux, BSD and Solaris. Any day you use the Internet, you are using and relying on dozens if not hundreds of machines operated and maintained using OpenSSH. A survey in 2008 showed that of the SSH servers found running, just over 80% were OpenSSH. [1] OpenSSH was first released towards the end of 1999. It is the latest step in a very long and useful history of networked computing, remote access and telecommuting. This book is for fellow users of OpenSSH to help them save effort and time through using OpenSSH, and especially SFTP, where it makes sense to use it.
  • ssl-cert-check » Linux Shtuff – [...] Digital certificates have become an essential part of Internet commerce, and are widely used to verify the identity of clients and servers. All digital certificates contain an expiration date which most client and server applications will check before using the certificates contents. If a client or server application detects that a certificate has expired, one or more implementation specific actions (e.g., abort connection, check or update a revocation list, alert user, etc.) are typically performed.[...]

Bookmarks for 12 ago 2013 through 16 ago 2013

These are my links for 12 ago 2013 through 16 ago 2013:

  • Epoptes – Epoptes (Επόπτης  - a Greek word for overseer) is an open source computer lab management and monitoring tool. It allows for screen broadcasting and monitoring, remote command execution, message sending, imposing restrictions like screen locking or sound muting the clients and much more! It can be installed in Ubuntu, Debian and openSUSE based labs that may contain any combination of the following: LTSP servers, thin and fat clients, non LTSP servers, standalone workstations, NX or XDMCP clients etc. Patches for other distros are welcome.
  • bcache – Bcache is a Linux kernel block layer cache. It allows one or more fast disk drives such as flash-based solid state drives (SSDs) to act as a cache for one or more slower hard disk drives. Hard drives are cheap and big, SSDs are fast but small and expensive. Wouldn't it be nice if you could transparently get the advantages of both? With Bcache, you can have your cake and eat it too. Bcache patches for the Linux kernel allow one to use SSDs to cache other block devices. It's analogous to L2Arc for ZFS, but Bcache also does writeback caching (besides just write through caching), and it's filesystem agnostic. It's designed to be switched on with a minimum of effort, and to work well without configuration on any setup. By default it won't cache sequential IO, just the random reads and writes that SSDs excel at. It's meant to be suitable for desktops, servers, high end storage arrays, and perhaps even embedded.
  • Shuttle | A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X – A simple SSH shortcut menu for OS X [ via http://etherealmind.com/os-x-shuttle-a-simple-ssh-shortcut-menu-for-os-x/ ]

Bookmarks for 25 feb 2013 through 19 mar 2013

These are my links for 25 feb 2013 through 19 mar 2013:

  • owncloud 5.0: Unable to upload files – Issue #2006 – The php version of Ubuntu 10.04 LTS it's too old for Owncloud 5.0. Here an help to upgrade to php 5.4
  • Xiki – A shell console with GUI features – Xiki does what shell consoles do, but lets you edit everything at any time. It's trivial to make your own commands and menus to access other tools. [ via braindead.tumblr.com ]
  • Active Directory Management with PowerShell in Windows Server 2008 R2 – One of the first things you notice with Windows Server 2008 R2 is that PowerShell 2.0 has become central to the admin function  There is a powerful Active Directory module for Powershell that contains a provider and cmdlets that are designed to allow you to manage Active Directory from the command line. Now, you can also use versions  for previous versions of Windows Server.