Archivio tag: commandline

Bookmarks for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014

These are my links for 13 lug 2014 through 14 lug 2014:

  • Inbox – The next-generation email platform – Inbox uses standard interfaces that you've come to expect from modern APIs. We've taken care of the bugs and edge-cases with character encodings, MIME structures, misformatted socket protocols, and more. Plus, your app will continue to "just work" over the same API as more providers are added.
  • RainLoop Webmail – Modest system requirements, decent performance, simple installation and upgrade, no database required – all these make RainLoop Webmail a perfect choice for your email solution. You are free to use RainLoop Webmail for your personal or non-profit projects.
  • LCMC – The LCMC is a GUI application that configures, manages and visualizes high-availability clusters. Specifically it manages clusters that use one or more of these components: Pacemaker, Corosync, Heartbeat, DRBD, KVM, XEN and LVM.
  • Index of /tig – Tig is an ncurses-based text-mode interface for git. It functions mainly as a Git repository browser, but can also assist in staging changes for commit at chunk level and act as a pager for output from various Git commands.
  • The World’s Most Powerful Browser-Based IDE – Codio – Codio is a powerful cloud and browser based IDE that covers the complete web development cycle; from prototype to deployment

Bookmarks for 27 giu 2014 through 30 giu 2014

These are my links for 27 giu 2014 through 30 giu 2014:

  • Fritzing Fritzing – Fritzing is an open-source hardware initiative that makes electronics accessible as a creative material for anyone. We offer a software tool, a community website and services in the spirit of Processing and Arduino, fostering a creative ecosystem that allows users to document their prototypes, share them with others, teach electronics in a classroom, and layout and manufacture professional pcbs.
  • vFense – Patch Management Made Easy – vFense is an Open-Source Cross-Platform Patch Management tool. Supported Operating Systems * RedHat 5.5 + ( RedHat Clones ) * Ubuntu 12.04 + ( Ubuntu Clones ) * OS X 10.6 + * Windows XP +
  • ShellCheck – Online shell script analyzer – automatically detects problems with sh/bash scripts and commands.

Bookmarks for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014

These are my links for 15 mag 2014 through 2 giu 2014:

  • Babun | A windows shell you will love! – Would you like to use a linux-like console on a Windows host without a lot of fuzz? Try out babun!
  • OpenSSH – Wikibooks, open books for an open world – The OpenSSH suite provides secure remote access and file transfer. Since its initial release, it has grown to become the most widely used implementation of the SSH protocol. During the first ten years of its existence, ssh has largely replaced older corresponding unencrypted tools and protocols. The OpenSSH client is included by default in most operating system distributions, including OS X, Linux, BSD and Solaris. Any day you use the Internet, you are using and relying on dozens if not hundreds of machines operated and maintained using OpenSSH. A survey in 2008 showed that of the SSH servers found running, just over 80% were OpenSSH. [1] OpenSSH was first released towards the end of 1999. It is the latest step in a very long and useful history of networked computing, remote access and telecommuting. This book is for fellow users of OpenSSH to help them save effort and time through using OpenSSH, and especially SFTP, where it makes sense to use it.
  • ssl-cert-check » Linux Shtuff – […] Digital certificates have become an essential part of Internet commerce, and are widely used to verify the identity of clients and servers. All digital certificates contain an expiration date which most client and server applications will check before using the certificates contents. If a client or server application detects that a certificate has expired, one or more implementation specific actions (e.g., abort connection, check or update a revocation list, alert user, etc.) are typically performed.[…]

Bookmarks for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014

These are my links for 30 apr 2014 through 6 mag 2014:

  • Ralentir le débit de postfix pour wanadoo/orange – Le blog de Michauko – Si vous avez un serveur d’envoi de mails (je ne parle pas d’être un spammeur) et beaucoup d’abonnés chez Wanadoo et Orange, vous risquez fort le rejet temporaire de votre serveur si le débit d’envoi est trop fort. C’est ce qui m’est arrivé et hop, 5000 mails entassés dans la file de postfix.
  • smtp-in.orange.fr refused to talk to me: postfix solution | floriancrouzat.net – Orange sadly limits inbound connexion to it’s MX to 1 connexion per IP, which is a total pain in the ass when you try to deliver newsletter, or manage a MTA. Here is a sample log from their MX: Jul 4 10:42:42 smtp.example.com postfix/smtp[32347]: 0123456789: host smtp-in.orange.fr[193.252.22.65] refused to talk to me: 421 mwinf5c34 ME Trop de connexions, veuillez verifier votre configuration. Too many connections, slow down. OFR004_104 [104] However, since they won’t change anything, we have to take mesures, here’s what you can do if you run postfix: you have to set a per-destination concurrency limit.
  • Aral Balkan: Historical Archive — How to revert (roll back) to a previous revision with Subversion – Here, then, is a very simple, plain English explanation of how to revert to a previous version of your application in Subversion, to help anyone who may be starting out with it and is lost.
  • Tmux: A Simple Start – In all likelihood, you’ve probably already heard of tmux. However, you may not be using it everyday. If tmux is on your “Someday” list because you think it is too complicated (I mean, c’mon, the word “multiplexer” is just plain scary), then I am here to show you just how easy it is to put tmux into your workflow.
  • Tyblog | Yet Another Vim Setup – Vim is an excellent text editor. I’ve used it for many years and like most vim users, have collected a fairly large collection of settings in my .vimrc and learned how to grok my vim usage effectively through a lot of trial and error. To that end, I’ve tried to assemble a useful overview of my experience with vim.