Bookmarks for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015

These are my links for 29 mag 2015 through 10 giu 2015:

  • My Blog: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: Basic Configuration – Our goal: Create an Auto Scaling EC2 Group in a single Availability Zone and use a HTTP status page as a Health Monitor for our Load Balancer and the Auto Scaling group instances. This exercise will show us some Auto Scaling basics and will be useful to understand the concepts beneath but the Auto Scaling Group will not automatically "scale" responding to external influence like Average CPU Usage or Total Apache Connections (This aspect is covered in this post: AWS EC2 Auto Scaling: External CloudWatch Metric). With the Auto Scaling configuration described here, we will obtain a web server cluster that can be increased and decreased in members with a simple Auto Scaling API call and we will transfer the monitoring role to the ELB to automatically replace failed EC2 instances or web servers.
  • Autoscaling with custom metrics « That’s Geeky – One of the appeals of cloud computing is the idea of using what you need when you need. One of the ways that Amazon provides for this is through autoscaling. In essence, this allows you to vary the number of (related) running instances according to some metric that is being tracked. In this article, we look at how you can trigger a change in the number of running instances using a custom Cloudwatch metric – including the setup of said metric, and a brief look at the interactions between the various autoscaling commands used.
  • Painless AWS Auto Scaling With EBS Snapshots And Capistrano – Boom – AWS (Amazon Web Services) auto scaling is a simple concept on the surface: You get an AMI, set up rules, and the load balancer takes care of the rest. However, actually getting it done is more complicated. Some choices are worse than others: you could bake an AMI (Amazon Machine Image) before you deploy, but that could add 10 minutes or more to each deployment. Some are dangerous: you could create an AMI after each deploy, but you run the risk that an auto scale even happens before your AMIs are done. Plus, you have a whole variety of AMIs deployed in at any given time. Some are similar to what we propose in this tutorial: you could push your code to S3 on each deploy and have user-data scripts that pull it down on each auto scaling event. However you slice it, to get auto scaling to fit into your development work flow in a transparent way takes careful thought and planning. We recently rolled out the following solution at CodePen. It keeps our AMIs static and our application ready for scaling on EBS (Elastic Block Store) snapshots. We can push code using Capistrano and let a few scripts distribute the ever-changing code base to our fleet of servers. I’d like to share the steps required to make it work. This series of posts will walk you through the steps required to build an auto-scaling infrastructure that stays out of your way.
  • : establishing geek cred since 1305712800 – Did you accidentally set node.normal[:foo][:bar] = 'something bad' in your chef recipe? Then you found that the node's normal attributes persisted between chef runs, and you really wanted to use the default attribute precedence level in your cookbook's attributes/default.rb file?

Bookmarks for 1 set 2014 through 2 set 2014

These are my links for 1 set 2014 through 2 set 2014:

  • The Twelve-Factor App – In the modern era, software is commonly delivered as a service: called web apps, or software-as-a-service. The twelve-factor app is a methodology for building software-as-a-service apps that: Use declarative formats for setup automation, to minimize time and cost for new developers joining the project; Have a clean contract with the underlying operating system, offering maximum portability between execution environments; Are suitable for deployment on modern cloud platforms, obviating the need for servers and systems administration; Minimize divergence between development and production, enabling continuous deployment for maximum agility; And can scale up without significant changes to tooling, architecture, or development practices. The twelve-factor methodology can be applied to apps written in any programming language, and which use any combination of backing services (database, queue, memory cache, etc).
  • British Behaviour, British Etiquette | Debrett’s – Our indispensable Guide to British life and manners. From Countryside Rules, Dress Codes, Kilts, Meeting Royalty and Port Etiquette to Apologising, Introductions, Queuing, Reticence, Small Talk and Understatment. British rituals, social occasions, manners and characteristics decoded.
  • A Mailserver on Ubuntu 12.04: Postfix, Dovecot, MySQL – This long post contains a recipe for building a reasonably secure Ubuntu 12.04 mailserver in Amazon Web Services, using Postfix 2.9.1, Dovecot 2.0.19, and MySQL 5.5.22, with anti-spam packages in the form of amavisd-new 2.6.5, Clam AntiVirus 0.97.3, SpamAssassin 3.3.2, and Postgrey 1.3.4. Local users are virtual rather than being system users. Administration of users and domains is achieved through the Postfix Admin 2.3.6 web interface. Webmail is provided by Horde Groupware Webmail Edition 5.04.

Bookmarks for 9 ott 2012 from 10:37 to 20:19

These are my links for 9 ott 2012 from 10:37 to 20:19:

  • notepadqq/notepadqq · GitHub – Linux clone of notepad++
  • Top 10 things you must read about vSphere 5.1 – Welcome to vSphere-land! – There has been so many documents, white papers, videos and blog posts posted about the vSphere 5.1 release that it’s hard to keep up with them all. I have at least 250 links gathered in my vSphere 5.1 Link-o-rama and it is still growing. With so many links it’s easy to miss some of the really good ones so I thought I would put together a top 10 list that highlights the ones that you don’t want to miss.
  • Three things you should never put in your database | Revolution Systems – As I've said in a few talks, the best way to improve your systems is by first not doing "dumb things". I don't mean you or your development staff is "dumb", it's easy to overlook the implications of these types of decisions and not realize how bad they are for maintainability let alone scaling. As a consultant I see this stuff all of the time and I have yet to ever see it work out well for anyone.

Bookmarks for 5 ott 2010 through 6 ott 2010

These are my links for 5 ott 2010 through 6 ott 2010:

  • DNS e Postfix: come non generare "spam" | Kreations Collective – […]Ho recentemente configurato alcuni server per l’invio di email. Parte del lavoro ha riguardato la corretta configurazione di Postfix e del server DNS per evitare che le email inviate venissero rilevate come spam.[…]<br />
    La configurazione ha riguardato tre punti principali:<br />
    Impostazione del record A e del reverse address<br />
    Impostazione di SPF<br />
    Configurazione di DKIM e DomainKeys<br />
  • How to build your own CDN using BIND, GeoIP, Nginx, Varnish | UNIXy – In this article, we shall outline the steps required to build a private Content Delivery or Distribution Network (CDN) using a VPS with Varnish Cache and Nginx. The goal is to build a CDN using free, readily available software but most importantly spend the least amount of funds possible. To this end, all nodes participating in this network are going to be virtual machines (Xen, Virtuozzo, OpenVZ, etc). Should you have any questions or comments on the configuration of this CDN, please post them in this forum:
  • Comandi testuali per i sistemi Windows – […] Al lavoro, spesso mi capita di dover eseguire le stesse operazioni su più server, più volte alla settimana. La maggior parte di queste operazioni riguardano utilità di sistema di Windows, come la gestione utenti di Active Directory, o quella del DNS od altro ancora. Certo, un collegamento sul desktop è comodo, ma in talune situazioni può tornare decisamente comodo (e più veloce) conoscere il nome degli eseguibili relativi ad un determinato pannello MMC, piuttosto che l’apposita applicazione contenuta nel Pannello di Controllo.<br />
    <br />
    Quello che segue è un elenco della maggior parte di questi comandi, tutti lanciabili direttamente dal pannello “Esegui” situato nello Start Menu di Windows. Alcuni di questi comandi possono essere distruttivi, portando addirittura alla formattazione del disco ed alla conseguente perdita di dati, per cui usateli solo se ritenete di essere in grado di farlo […]